USFWS

SCA CDIP Intern Geovanni Salgado at a US Fish and Wildlife Service refuge

Are you passionate about wildlife? Ever considered turning that passion into a career? SCA internships with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offer opportunities to work directly an indirectly with wild animals—from sea turtles to salmon, bats to butterflies, avocets to albatrosses—restoring their habitats, monitoring their numbers, sharing their stories with the public, and more. If you want to learn the ins and outs of wildlife conservation, and contribute meaningfully to the preservation of wildlife and wildlife habitat, an SCA internship with USFWS in the place to begin.  

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employs over 9,000 people to manage 150 million acres of land spread across over 551 National Wildlife Refuges and thousands of smaller sites all over the country. Interning through SCA is a perfect way to get involved with the agency and decide if a career in wildlife management is the right thing for you.

We post new positions all the time for a variety of interests, skill levels, and timeframes, including many that are tailored for the summer months. Check our search page often and you’ll always find something new!

Career Discovery Internship Program

SCA has partnered with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to provide over 50 internships for students from culturally and ethnically diverse backgrounds.

 

An SCA Intern tagging ducks at a US Fish and Wildlife Service National RefugeFWS Directorate Fellows Program

SCA is partnering with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to provide fellowship opportunities for rising seniors and recent graduates interested in a conservation career. Summer fellowships are available in a variety of fields, including biological sciences, natural resources, and refuge management.

News, Stories & Projects

Open Spaces, the official blog of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is now featuring monthly posts by Student Conservation Association interns working to promote, protect, and study wildlife on public lands all over the United States.

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Where to begin? How many 22 year-old lumberjacks can say that they have cut down a blowdown with a congressman, the Secretary of the Interior, President of the Wilderness Society and the Director of the US Fish and Wildlife Service? My head is inflating just thinking about it. But after yesterday my crew and I can say just that.

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In the most famous passage of the Wilderness Act, writer Howard Zahniser defines wilderness beautifully and concisely: “A wilderness, in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.” As my crewmates and I work to prepare Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge to host the Wilderness Act’s 50th birthday party—which w

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When William Bradford hopped off of the Mayflower and onto Plymouth Rock, he described the landscape that lay before him as a “hideous and desolate wilderness.” Wilderness, in 1620, was not a scarce resource to be protected and treasured. It was scary and empty, a wasted space awaiting the day that an enterprising human might chop it up, organize it, and put it to good use.

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For those that love history as well as the outdoors, Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, located along the Delaware coast, is a birder’s paradise. The refuge also features a pre-revolutionary war farmhouse on the National Register of Historic Places. Saltwater marshes at the refuge are first-rate habitats for many migratory birds that stop in Delaware Bay on their journey along the Atlantic Flyway.

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