Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Jon Whiting |

Well, the final week of my internship has come and gone.

A few of us went down to Bon Secour National Wildlife Reserve to try and catch a sea turtle hatching at one of their beach sites. To my dismay, they sensed I was coming to the area and waited to hatch until the day after I’d left.

Posted by Staff |
Big Cypress National Swamp

ASB crew members hard at work. Back (left to right): Nick, Chris, Tom. Front: Kenneth.

Officially, Big Cypress is a National “Preserve”, but why should we be so bland? Why not call it what it really is? After all, we have national forests, national grasslands, national seashores, national lakeshores, etc., etc., etc. The benefits of these descriptive names are many.

Posted by Staff |

This is the eleventh entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.This photo is from the 2008 SCA Photo Contest and was taken by SCA Members in Denali National Park.

Posted by Madalee Haines |

Learning to Cross-Cut (SCA’s Maggie and David

I am writing this blog from a couch in my U.S. Forest Service bunkhouse here in Summit County, CO. It feels good to rest on this soft surface with my feet up, as my bones are aching from all of the hiking that we do here. Even so, I wouldn’t trade this experience for anything.

Posted by Staff |

Jacob rests on the front loader following a tough day in the field.

When I signed up for the Student “Conservation” Association’s Alternative Spring Break (ASB), I thought knew what to expect. We’d be doing some planting, some harvesting, some taking care of the land.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Session 2 of NPS Academy 2013 commenced on March 10 at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Here are some highlights from a week of training and camaraderie amongst a diverse group of conservation-minded young people.”Lance, our facilitator, spoke on the importance of a key element in all relationships, including our own with the NPS: trust.

Posted by Staff |

Written by SCA alumni and recruiting reps Beth McCarthy, and Deanna Wyatt.
The second extension of SCA’s NPS Academy, a program designed to promote diversity within the National Park Service took place at Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Posted by Anna Megan Borthwick |

History has always been a major interest of mine. I received my bachelor’s degree in history from Chico state in 2011, and went on to gain a masters in historic preservation at University of Oregon, intending to apply my knowledge of history to preserving the raw material of our heritage.

Posted by Staff |

Ben Goldfarb recently completed a hitch as an SCA Fisheries intern at Yellowstone, charged with helping restore the native cutthroat trout, a food source for grizzlies and otters among others. You can learn more about these photos and Ben’s assignment by visiting his blog, wastivore.blogspot.

Posted by Staff |

Generally, when we think of science we think of lab coats and test tubes. Sparkling, sterile laboratories where PhDs churn out new truths. At least when it comes to most environmental sciences this is not the case. While a large part of science will always take place in the lab, it has to start in the field.

Posted by Staff |

Trail Crew on Mount Rogers in 1993. Found via the SCA Facebook Group.This is the twentieth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

56 years ago, a movement began. It was based around the idea that young conservationists would jump at the opportunity to serve their communities, give back to nature, and help conserve our treasured outdoor spaces.When the first group of SCA volunteers reported for work at Olympic National Park, they weren’t there to embody this powerful idea, they were there to save the park.

Posted by Staff |

Photos by David Krantz

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) With fellow SCA/CDIP interns Emily Zhang and Rani Jacobson. Photo credit: Emily

What does it mean when you’ve been pooped on repeatedly? By birds, of course.

The birds in question would be common terns with their largest nesting population located on 17-acre Great Gull Island, one of Long Island Sound’s barrier islands.

Posted by Staff |

Editor’s note: The essay below, a tale of triumph and tragedy, was written by SCA Pittsburgh member Siraji Hassan for his graduation from SCA’s Leadership in the Environment Advancement Program (LEAP), a conservation program for youth in poverty. Siraji’s presentation won an award that evening and his story may well win your heart.

Posted by Staff |

Their morning commute is a 35 minute hike past colossal cacti and under constant sun. Not a Starbucks or a donut shop in sight. Once they arrive, they use some admittedly silly routines to ensure everyone is stretched before they pick up their tools and go to work.This is how every day has started for nearly the past two weeks.

Posted by Staff |

LOCATION: South Side Park DATE & TIME: Saturday, October 23, 10am-3pmEVENT RECAP: 12 CLC students, 7 staff and former crew leaders, and 11 neighborhood volunteers attended what turned out to be a sunshine and energy-filled workday in South Side Park in Pittsburgh’s South Side Slopes neighborhood.

Posted by Staff |

In keeping with the application of much of our free time around camp, I’ll lead off today’s post with a trivia question: what weighs five pounds, looks like a pair of pie plates, and likes to hide next to Yuccas, under bushes, and in holes? Answer: the desert tortoise.

Posted by Staff |

A quick synopsis of the stand outs from this week’s media blitz:Backpacker: It’s good to see Obama join in on his own initiatives.Huffington Post: “I think the president has pretty good shoveling skills,” Obama said of Clinton’s work.WJZ Baltimore: This is an Earth Day a Baltimore City teen will remember for the rest of his life.Washington Post: “Great job, trees,” VPOTUS said after it was over.

Posted by Staff |

The taller buildings of St. Cloud are replaced by warehouses, then sheds and barns as the bus plugs on towards the Pothole Prairie region of western Minnesota. The trees, broad, bright and bushy from the near-solstice days, are interspersed by ponds and meadows.

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