Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

I guess I forgot to mention in my first post a little bit about myself. I am twenty years old and a senior at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY. I am an Environmental Studies major with a double minor in Geoscience and Latin American Studies. I play Division III tennis for William Smith.

Posted by Staff |

So today was a lot warmer waking up, so i must say, I was in an incredible mood. Breakfast was great and I have to give it up to Elliot, our cook. I have a passion for cooking, but I can’t imagine rustling up some of the grub that Elliot does at our campsite. He’s been fantastic.

After breakfast we headed out to our designated worksite.

Posted by Staff |
More year-end, all-time-great photos. Thanks Garrett and Kevin for your photos! And thanks American Eagle Outfitters for making SCA's Alternative Spring Break program possible. Sign Up for News & Stories

Posted by Staff |

From the Mount Rainier National Park Volunteer Newsletter September 2012.
We would like to highlight a special intern this summer to help show how much the park relies on and appreciates our volunteers. The east side Backcountry Intern through the Student Conservation Association, Kris Youtz, was first on scene to an emergency call in the Glacier Basin area in the past month.

Posted by Jacqueline Keating |

Where are you from? Sounds like a simple question, right?

Posted by Staff |

SCA alumna Valerie Lysenko sent me this story about an Earth Day event she hosted this weekend.Hello Fellow SCA’ers!This is Valerie from Middlesex County in NJ reporting on an Earth Day Tree Planting event our Conservation Corps just had.As the head planner and organizer, I spent many weeks scouting the planting site, getting all the materials together, and recruiting and mobilizing volunteers. I decided to pick an old abandoned field off a hidden road where I believe once stood an abandoned house. Since the site is part of a huge preserve, it is often disregarded as nothing more than a dumping ground. In fact, this small parcel of land hosts a very unique ecosystem – the Pine Barrens. Characterized by pines, oaks, and dry/sandy soil, the Pine Barrens make New Jersey one of the only states in the US with this type of habitat. Needless to say, its protection is crucial.

Posted by Staff |

At first it was simple. As we marched from the road through the desert, there was a small Sahara Mustard here, a small one over there, but really not many. With about one invasive plant per ten SCA volunteers, it wasn’t really much of a job. I was just letting my guard down, only to navigate around a creosote bush and BAM.

Posted by Staff |

So my first official night was a success, but I’m not going to lie, I was a little scared. A thunderstorm rolled in around 1:30AM and took the power out for a couple of minutes.The entire bunkhouse was pitch black. On the brighter side, I should be able to conquer my fear of the dark this summer!I am in Lake Charles now, looking around and taking in everything Louisianan.

Posted by Staff |

Photo via Giovanni Paccaloni, Flickr

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. (March 19, 2013) — Nearly everybody here has a story of someone who has driven into a canal. That’s just life in the ‘Glades.

Canals cut along all the roads here; they always have. The roads were made by digging the canals and dumping the dirt to form the roadways.

Posted by Staff |

Next to one of the refuge visitor’s centers, of which there are two, were many patches of crown vetch and leafy spurge. Both of these are invasive species the refuge is trying to eradicate.

Posted by Venice Wong |

The second day at Malibu Lagoon State Beach we continued our invasives battle. A small group kayaked out to one of the further islands to do work. One problem. There were only two kayaks available so ASB members had to be ferried out two at a time - a hilarious scene to behold.

Posted by Staff |

Sometimes its a little too easy to get caught up in what you don’t have. For me currently, the big ones are internet, cell service, and the ability to make it to the coffee pot before my twelve other bunkmates do.

Posted by Staff |

by Emma Jornlin, SCA SeattleAs I learn more and more about the history of Earth Day, I get the feeling that Gaylord Nelson did not intend for the day to be about blackberries. Yet year after year, for the past five years of my life, Earth Day here in Seattle has always involved this prickly plant.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

On the third weekend of October of this year, the Outdoor Nation San Francisco Summit brought together young outdoorsmen from all over the US to encourage them to lead their peers off of the couch and into the foliage. SCA’s Alumni Council gathered at the event to play a special role: Highlighting the fact that an active outdoor lifestyle is the perfect precursor to a career in conservation.

Posted by Staff |

Construction of a 76 foot bridge over Econfina Creek in Florida. Photo courtesy of Justin Poehnelt via the SCA Facebook group.This is the thirtieth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Staff |

The season of giving is upon us and, with it, the opportunity to celebrate all those who give of themselves to preserve and extend our rich natural and cultural heritage. This, of course, includes the young women and men of SCA, the generous patrons who support them, and the resource managers who guide them.

Posted by Staff |

Jennica getting a letter!

1. Nature’s Alarm Clock. I strategically position my tent on each hitch to face the rising sun. I tend to be restless in the morning anyway, meaning I frequently wake up and fall back asleep. After a few days, it’s pretty easy to remember where the sun is at certain times, and judge when it’s time to get the stove fired up for oatmeal!

Posted by Staff |

We all know President-elect Obama is a strong proponent of service, but everyone has different ideas about what that should mean.Naturally, here at SCA we’re focused on conservation service. And we’d like to know, as an SCA alum or supporter, what would you tell the President if you had a chance to chat with him about conservation service?Leave us your thoughts here in the comments section.

Posted by Staff |

So I went hiking through the forest the other day on Bulls Island.

Beautiful is all I can say! I’ve never experienced such a place that was so beautiful and preserved in its original state. The way the trees bristled and the way the pines stretched for what seemed like miles above my head.

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