Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

At first it was simple. As we marched from the road through the desert, there was a small Sahara Mustard here, a small one over there, but really not many. With about one invasive plant per ten SCA volunteers, it wasn’t really much of a job. I was just letting my guard down, only to navigate around a creosote bush and BAM.

Posted by Staff |

So my first official night was a success, but I’m not going to lie, I was a little scared. A thunderstorm rolled in around 1:30AM and took the power out for a couple of minutes.The entire bunkhouse was pitch black. On the brighter side, I should be able to conquer my fear of the dark this summer!I am in Lake Charles now, looking around and taking in everything Louisianan.

Posted by Vicki Rubino |

There is always a moment when a team truly becomes cohesive. I think we reached this point during the second week of the NYC Sandy Recovery Leader Crew. The previous weekend, all of the NYC crew leaders attended the New Jersey crew leader training, which is always a wonderful bonding experience.

Posted by Staff |

Environmental education is tricky.

I have known this fact for a while, but it’s become a constant consideration in my full time work as an environmental education intern at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During my time in Alaska working with youth in the field, youI have been a careful observer of the educators and their methods of…well, education!

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Dani Thompson, SCA’s Designated Caption Quality Evaluator (and FWS Alaska intern) has picked her winner for Round 3 of the Conservation Caption Competition, Fall 2012 Edition. Behold:Congratulations to Johanna Weaver for being toadily hilarious (so, so sorry for that pun).

Posted by Staff |

I’ve seen some worn trails but never one like this before.You might think I was still at Grand Canyon but look closely.  This is the Garwood Trail at Saguaro National Park East near Tucson.  Heavy equestrian use has turned the trail into a trench.This SCA ASB crew — all volunteers from Vermont Academy — has been working for the past week and a half to restore the hazardous trail.  In some cases

Posted by Staff |

SCA is thrilled to announce the following winners for our 2011 Got Dirt? Photo Contest. These photos inspired us in one way or another to get out and enjoy nature. Thank you to the more than 6,000 entries we received.
Grand Prize winner: Denis Dessoliers, “Morning”It was sprinkling when I was driving up to Clear Lake, Colorado.

Posted by Staff |

SCA, in partnership with the city of Manchester, hosted an adopt-a-block cleanup and a celebration in Veteran’s Park.

Posted by Staff |

Erryday I’m shovelin’. (Shovelin’, shovelin’.)

Shovelin’ out the Harding Icefield Trail, that is—scooping snow out of the track, piling it on switchbacks or trampled vegetation to protect plants and the trail from erosion.

Posted by Staff |

One of the great things about working for a park in the National Capital Region is the number of park service sites in such close proximity to one another- 46 to be exact!

Posted by Eliza Stokes |

I spent the past five days of my SCA internship at Child’s Glacier, a 300-450 foot tall calving glacier about an hour and a half from Cordova.

Posted by Staff |

Photo: Only 25% of tents are pictured.

Meeting 35 new people at once is never easy. Never mind getting to know them in the dark of night.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

What an inspiring (and busy) few days it’s been! We asked you to take a break from your service over the weekend to tell the world how or why you serve the planet. The response was, predictably, impressive.Big thanks to all those who participated! By sharing your reasons for service, you helped inspire the world to serve.With so many great responses, picking a winner was tough.

Posted by Staff |

Written by Lauren Freedman Whittlesey, SCA ‘10 alum, Alternative Spring Break in the Grand Canyon. Lauren turned her internship into a green job with SCA working in various capacities for the Marketing and Advancement teams.

Posted by Staff |

Training simulation at Crew Leader Training in Charlestown, NH.

Posted by Staff |

Indian Creek Rec. Area near Markleeville, CA

Number 11: Appreciate and choose, when possible, meaningful work rather than just making a living.
-from Arne Naess’ “Lifestyle Trends Within the Deep Ecology Movement”

Five days ago, all of this around me – the land, the people, the flora and fauna – was foreign.

Posted by Staff |

SCA staff member Ashley Hansen provided us with this account of volunteering on Inauguration Day:I witnessed history.I witnessed hundreds of volunteers gather for a 5 am check-in to serve our country.I witnessed my fellow volunteers flow into Starbucks on the corner of 14th and New York Ave to stay warm while the staff called in for backup and fixed the broken toilet.

Posted by Staff |

Monarch week has begun at Prairie Wetlands Learning Center! Four generations of monarchs have hatched this summer from their eggs on Minnesota’s milkweeds. The generation, which will be winging it to Mexico and other wintering sites, have emerged from their chrysalis on the prairie. Dozens can easily be found flitting from flower to flower as they fatten up on nectar before their flight.

Posted by Staff |

Hello, readers!

My third day of camping and serving with the Student Conservation Association (SCA) in the Santa Monica Mountains has wrapped up.

Yesterday was a day of toil well worth the exhaustion. We spent several hours at Santa Monica Beach Park removing the rest of the leafy carnations and clover weeds.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) Conservation intern Maria Gross, re-stringing a fishing pole

My last blog post I gave you a little introduction to the park I work in and my SCA placement. I also (hopefully) gave you some insight into me as a person and conservationist. I hold a firm belief that in order to achieve environmental greatness, one must begin at the source.

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