Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

This post was written by Lilly Stewart.

One of the great things about my internship with the SCA Hudson Valley Corps is the opportunity to work with other organizations, learn new things and take part in exciting programs like the Clearwater. For one fantastic week I got to be a sailor and teach environmental programs while sailing up and down the Hudson River.

Posted by Staff |

This week we have been focused on capturing an untagged sow and possibly her cubs. The sow has been getting in to packs and getting near developed areas too frequently. We would like to put a radio collar on the sow and at least tag the cubs.

Posted by Staff |

New Hampshire Conservation Corps members have spent the last several months teaching elementary school students about the environment in the Manchester Public Schools.

Posted by Deb Keller |

With longboards, shortboards, skateboards, and three SRO concerts, it was a wild scene at the Nike US Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach, CA – but SCA helped to ensure it was a clean scene, too.SCA volunteers and staff removed copious amounts of litter from the beach which, as our own Joe Thurston tweeted, may have otherwise been headed to “one of those gargantuan offshore trash islands.” Sevente

Posted by Staff |

Great job SCA, crew and leaders! The new trail extension is almost done and a portion of an existing trail has been rerouted. Today, it’s onto the bog bridge, weather permitting.

Posted by Emmet Pruss |

The termination of 2 short weeks will mark the completion of the SCA program that I have been a part of with 22 companions for the last 10 months.

Posted by Staff |

One of the biggest perks of working at a national Wildlife Refuge as an SCA intern is the amount of opportunities available outside of the job description. Everyone at the Refuge, my supervisor in particular, have been incredibly supportive and active in making sure that I have a real taste of what’s available to me in the Service.

Posted by Staff |

Originally Posted By Casey Welch on the Southwest Airlines BlogOn April 7, the Student Conservation Association (SCA), a national leader in youth service and stewardship, named Southwest Airlines its “Official Airline.” Additionally, we’re getting our hands dirty and joining student volunteers at SCA Earth Day service projects across our system for our Spring Share the Spirit initiative.The charit

Posted by Staff |

Photo: Air plants

So today was our first day waking up at the campsite in Collier Seminole Park. I must say
it is a bit chillier than I anticipated, or packed for. After waking up and eating breakfast we played a couple games and got to know the friendly faces we have the pleasure of sharing this experience with.

Posted by Staff |

Some weeks you’ve got to move boxes. Moving is one of those inevitably dreadful tasks that we all must undertake throughout our lives. It gets even more interesting when the stuff your moving isn’t yours and the stuff was packed by yet another person. That’s the situation we’ve been in this week up at Schoodic. Unfortunately the construction up here took longer than planned.

Posted by Staff |

A high school crew in Great Smoky Mountains National Park shot this footage on a Flip video camera last summer. Take a peek into the lives of SCA crew members in the field…This is the twenty-fifth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Daniel Ramirez |
The milky, jade green water of the creek comes from glacial flour - the pulverized rock that is scraped off the mountainside as the glacier moves

The milky, jade green water of the creek comes from glacial flour - the pulverized rock that is scraped off the mountainside as the glacier moves.

Disclaimer: OK, so the photos in this post have little to do with its content, but what’s a good blog without pictures?

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Conservation Caption Competition, Round 4, go!There must be a tale behind why this SCA member is running around a parking lot wrapped snugly in a mummy bag… Clue us in with your best caption (either here or on Facebook) by 5 PM EST on Monday 5/20.

Posted by Staff |

Our hearts go out to the hundreds of thousands of other families who were not as fortunate. As recovery begins, please see the following links for more:Getting HelpThe Red Cross “Find Help” pageAfter Sandy: Resources to get back on trackHow to HelpDonate to Red CrossGive BloodThe White House - How to Help the Survivors of Hurricane SandySeven way to help online

Posted by Staff |

Written by April Hamblin, SCA ‘11 Yellowstone National Park, as part of the National Park Service Academy.

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