Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Vicki Rubino |

There is always a moment when a team truly becomes cohesive. I think we reached this point during the second week of the NYC Sandy Recovery Leader Crew. The previous weekend, all of the NYC crew leaders attended the New Jersey crew leader training, which is always a wonderful bonding experience.

Posted by Staff |

Environmental education is tricky.

I have known this fact for a while, but it’s become a constant consideration in my full time work as an environmental education intern at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During my time in Alaska working with youth in the field, youI have been a careful observer of the educators and their methods of…well, education!

Posted by Kalina Chung |

We got our Burlap (and mulch) delivery! Here’s a picture of SCA’s Finest taking a break on the comfy burlap, soon to be used for purposes other than cushion.

After our first week at the site, SCA’s Finest crew has finally settled down into a fun and productive routine, which perfectly fits one of our frequently used mottos, “work hard, play hard”.

Posted by Jarred Shaw |

Here’s Jarred’s crew mate, Leah Cantor, with her take on the SCA Sandy Relief Corps experience. PHOTO: Jennica Tamler and Leah Cantor (L-R)

Mother Nature can be a powerful and heartbreaking force. The neighborhood I was born and raised in was completely wrecked.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

On the third weekend of October of this year, the Outdoor Nation San Francisco Summit brought together young outdoorsmen from all over the US to encourage them to lead their peers off of the couch and into the foliage. SCA’s Alumni Council gathered at the event to play a special role: Highlighting the fact that an active outdoor lifestyle is the perfect precursor to a career in conservation.

Posted by Staff |

The season of giving is upon us and, with it, the opportunity to celebrate all those who give of themselves to preserve and extend our rich natural and cultural heritage. This, of course, includes the young women and men of SCA, the generous patrons who support them, and the resource managers who guide them.

Posted by Staff |

Jennica getting a letter!

1. Nature’s Alarm Clock. I strategically position my tent on each hitch to face the rising sun. I tend to be restless in the morning anyway, meaning I frequently wake up and fall back asleep. After a few days, it’s pretty easy to remember where the sun is at certain times, and judge when it’s time to get the stove fired up for oatmeal!

Posted by Staff |

By Wendy Liscow, Program Officer, The Geraldine R. Dodge FoundationOne warm, crystal clear morning in August, I was lacing up my hiking boots with great anticipation.

Posted by Staff |

So I went hiking through the forest the other day on Bulls Island.

Beautiful is all I can say! I’ve never experienced such a place that was so beautiful and preserved in its original state. The way the trees bristled and the way the pines stretched for what seemed like miles above my head.

Posted by Staff |

1977 Youth Conservation Corps backcountry work crew on the shores of Shoshone Lake. The Student Conservation Association was the staff contractor for the program.

Posted by Jenny Myung |
Sunset at the Smokejumper base

Sunset at the Smokejumper base

At first glance, my cushy job as a tour guide doesn’t seem like such a great catch. For the most part, I sit behind a desk, greet visitors and give the same 45-minute tour day-in and day-out.

Posted by Staff |

So today was a lot warmer waking up, so i must say, I was in an incredible mood. Breakfast was great and I have to give it up to Elliot, our cook. I have a passion for cooking, but I can’t imagine rustling up some of the grub that Elliot does at our campsite. He’s been fantastic.

After breakfast we headed out to our designated worksite.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

On March 4, a culturally and geographically diverse bunch of students gathered with SCA in the Grand Tetons to learn what it takes to run a national park. Here are a few highlights from the week.”On the second day we did a lot.

Posted by Staff |

We are please to announce the winners of the I Heart Snow 2012 Photo Contest!

Posted by Jacqueline Keating |

Where are you from? Sounds like a simple question, right?

Posted by Staff |

I’m sitting here in a park cafeteria that won’t open for another hour, the lights down low and a couple of staffers puttering about. Five for Fighting’s “What Kind of World Do You Want?” is coming out of the ceiling speakers.

Posted by Staff |

Art, education, and community made a comeback at the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center this weekend. It was “Return to Prairie Days” (a Fergus Falls Signature Event, proclaims the town’s event calendar), bringing students, artists, locals and outsiders to the refuge for a pageant, duck banding, butterfly tagging, and prairie planting.

Posted by Staff |

Posted by Staff |

Members of the next Sandy restoration crew will fly into New York this weekend from all around the country: places like Chino Hills, CA, Greendale, WI, and Moore, OK. Moore, the OKC suburb that was flattened just three and a half weeks ago by an EF5 tornado. Twenty-three dead, 13,000 homes destroyed or damaged, $2 billion of widespread wreckage.

Posted by Staff |

Photo via Giovanni Paccaloni, Flickr

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. (March 19, 2013) — Nearly everybody here has a story of someone who has driven into a canal. That’s just life in the ‘Glades.

Canals cut along all the roads here; they always have. The roads were made by digging the canals and dumping the dirt to form the roadways.

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