Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Carolyn Lucey |

I can’t believe the AEO Sandy Recovery Crew has already finished our week of conservation work at Floyd Bennet Field in Gateway National Recreation Area.

Posted by Staff |

I would like to begin this post with a polite rescinding of all of the nice things I have ever said about greenbrier. Blackberries will always be a sworn enemy, but after this afternoon, the greenbrier has fallen out of my favor as well.

We got a slow start to the day, a bunch of refuge business fell out of the sky all at once.

Posted by Staff |

The following email was sent from SCA President Dale Penny to SCA friends in the regions most affected by Hurricane Sandy. We continue to provide updates on SCA’s response to Sandy via SCA’s Conservation Nation blog.Dear SCA Friend,Like you, SCA is greatly concerned about the people and places affected by Hurricane Sandy.

Posted by Staff |

This is the tenth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.This photo is from the 2008 SCA Photo Contest.

Posted by Staff |

As 2011 comes to a close, we’re looking back at the top stories that caught your attention this year. They range from tagging alligators in the Bayou to confessions of a park ranger on the Washington mall! But regardless of location, one thing all the stories have in common is the passion our SCA members have for protecting and preserving the land and our national treasures.

Posted by Staff |

Now that our trail was finished all we needed to do was build the benches and trashcan holder in order to complete our project. But we ran into a few bumps along the road, at first the wood wasn’t in on time and when it came in it wasn’t the correct kind. Luckily Bobby was nice enough to take it to the store and exchange it that same day.

Posted by Staff |

I noticed the first acorn hit my house this morning. By the end of August they will be falling like rain and waking me up as they pelt the house. The acorns fall from oak trees and deer love to eat them. We regularly see large bucks grazing just outside our bathroom window.

by Karrie Kressler

Posted by Karrie Kressler |

I started seriously bicycling only recently when I moved to Pittsburgh, which is a heck of a place to start considering all of the hills here. It’s also surprising considering that while I was growing up I watched my role-model-dad bike to work every fair-weathered day.

Posted by Staff |

A crew from the Student Conservation Association WildCorps has been working on a variety of projects on lands managed by BLM-California. WildCorps is a partnership with the BLM, to train a cadre of youth leaders to enhance public lands.

Posted by Jarred Shaw |

Our first day on post-Sandy restoration duty at Cheesequake State Park began with a foggy morning. Dave Donnelly, park superintendent, met us bright and early, outfitted for the damp weather with bright yellow rubber boots. When we told him that two of our chainsaws were on the disabled list, his gracious response was to lend us a couple spares from Cheesequake’s own gear cache.

Posted by Staff |

Written by Kate Hagner, SCA’s AmeriCorps Program and Evaluation manager, in celebration of AmeriCorps week, March 9 -17th. SCA and AmeriCorps share a common history: President Roosevelt’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).

Posted by Staff |

SCA President Dale Penny and SCA Alum Marcus Hendricks spoke at the hearing.

Posted by Anna Megan Borthwick |

History has always been a major interest of mine. I received my bachelor’s degree in history from Chico state in 2011, and went on to gain a masters in historic preservation at University of Oregon, intending to apply my knowledge of history to preserving the raw material of our heritage.

Posted by Staff |

Written by Evan Escamilla, SCA alum ‘10 and ‘11 and current SCA recruiter.What an amazing couple of days it has been here in the Tetons!

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) Our unamused faces at Mount Rushmore on the 4th of July

—As Teddy Roosevelt always said: ‘Speak softly, but carry a large rock bar’.—

Work days in South Dakota quickly coming to an end, it was time for the much anticipated Rec trip which was to be a smorgasbord of all the activities the Black Hills has to offer.

Posted by Staff |

There are so many random things going on right now in the world of Yosemite wildlife. Variety is the spice of life, and it is definitely keeping life exciting.

The bears are generally eating natural food sources right now, which is great. We have been watching them eat apples, blackberries, and scouring logs for insects. The apples are blooming but are not quite ripe for human consumption.

Posted by Anna Megan Borthwick |

Entrance to the WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument, Pearl Harbor Visitor Center

Certain events forever change the course of American history, defining our nation’s identity and future. The bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 was one such event, leading America into World War II.

Posted by Staff |

I’ve seen some worn trails but never one like this before.You might think I was still at Grand Canyon but look closely.  This is the Garwood Trail at Saguaro National Park East near Tucson.  Heavy equestrian use has turned the trail into a trench.This SCA ASB crew — all volunteers from Vermont Academy — has been working for the past week and a half to restore the hazardous trail.  In some cases

Posted by Staff |

The cohort after a great buggy ride out to the worksite.

From our early ancestors’ use of lightning strikes for ignition, to the discovery of the flint, to the modern-day advancements of spark plugs and lighters, fire has, and will always be, a cornerstone to human civilization.

We as humans depend on fire for cooking. We rely on fire to keep us warm in the harshest of climates.

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