Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

Thanks to everyone who came out to Kingman and Heritage Islands and made for an incredibly successful day!
Over 80 volunteers, SCA alumni and staff hauled away bulging bags of litter, the remains of a dilapidated birdhouse (which had to be demolished with sledgehammers first!), invasive plants, and re-routed a section of newly-built trail out of some wet areas.

Posted by Staff |

Since all work and no play makes Alternative Spring Break the dull boy, today our crew spent the day enjoying all that Joshua Tree National Park offers its 1.7 million annual guests. After splitting into two groups, half of our team went rock climbing, and half went on a tour of Key’s Ranch.

Posted by Staff |

We’ve been doing a lot more more forest inventory. Last week, Becky the Biotec told me and the other two interns at the dorms that we would be working near Rapids Lake. We usually learn what we are doing the morning of because there has been a lot of flooding this summer.

Posted by Madalee Haines |

This past week I finished up my internship with the U.S. Forest Service in Dillon, Colorado. It was a busy time, wrapping up with an end of term backpacking trip and several patrols. It all went by extremely quickly and before I knew it I was packing up for Moab, Utah to head to my new internship with the National Park Service.

Posted by Staff |

Over the course of today we got to experience what building a community is truly like, through the destruction of another. You may have seen in Justin and Kenneth’s blogs that they have already experienced the demolition site. Our main goal today was to help remove a house that, through acquisition, is now located in Big Cypress National Preserve.

Posted by Staff |

This trailer for a soon-to-be released film called Mother Nature’s Child caught our attention and we hope it engages yours. Please tell you what you think.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) A pair of American Oystercatchers

There’s something about New England that keeps drawing me back every summer. It started with a visit to rustic and folksy Vermont with a little of bustling Boston back in 2010.

Posted by Staff |

Editor’s note: The essay below, a tale of triumph and tragedy, was written by SCA Pittsburgh member Siraji Hassan for his graduation from SCA’s Leadership in the Environment Advancement Program (LEAP), a conservation program for youth in poverty. Siraji’s presentation won an award that evening and his story may well win your heart.

Posted by Staff |

This is the twenty-second entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Staff |

LOCATION: South Side Park DATE & TIME: Saturday, October 23, 10am-3pmEVENT RECAP: 12 CLC students, 7 staff and former crew leaders, and 11 neighborhood volunteers attended what turned out to be a sunshine and energy-filled workday in South Side Park in Pittsburgh’s South Side Slopes neighborhood.

Posted by Staff |

In an area right by where we were pulling Sahara Mustard earlier, we worked with rangers to help conduct a survey on the desert tortoise population.

Posted by Daniel Ramirez |
The milky, jade green water of the creek comes from glacial flour - the pulverized rock that is scraped off the mountainside as the glacier moves

The milky, jade green water of the creek comes from glacial flour - the pulverized rock that is scraped off the mountainside as the glacier moves.

Disclaimer: OK, so the photos in this post have little to do with its content, but what’s a good blog without pictures?

Posted by Staff |

I guess I forgot to mention in my first post a little bit about myself. I am twenty years old and a senior at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY. I am an Environmental Studies major with a double minor in Geoscience and Latin American Studies. I play Division III tennis for William Smith.

Posted by Venice Wong |

For a small change of pace, the National Park Service led us to Upper Zuma Canyon. Despite a new location with greenery that was vaguely reminiscent of the forests of Washington, our task for the day was a classic conservation work: removing invasives This time we took on the poison hemlock and Italian thistle.

Posted by Staff |

I became an SCA intern at the beginning of the summer with the charge of assessing the invasive lionfish population in Biscayne National Park. Lionfish are quickly taking over coral reefs in the Caribbean, eating as many tiny fish and invertebrates as possible – including commercially important juvenile fish (the ones that provide people with a living and food).

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

SCA’s caption quality evaluation intern*, Danielle Thompson, has selected her favorite of this week’s captions.BEHOLD. Congratulations to Greg Jackson for coming up with the winner. Greg, keep an eye out for the postman; your prize is in the mail.This round of the Conservation Caption Competition, Fall 2012 Edition, has been brought to you by SCA national partner Dr Pepper Snapple Group.

Posted by Staff |

In 4 weeks, we built a bridge and ten steps, cleaned up three miles of trail, rerouted a section that was crumbling into the bayou, survived a two-week heat wave of 110+ F degree days, formed a great connection with a new SCA agency partner, survived poisonous snakes and spiders, mosquitoes, chiggers, scorpions, wild boars…shepherded 8 teenagers, some of whom had never camped before and most of

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Hey conservation-minded people who are terrible at photography, stop fretting over the fact that you’ll never win SCA’s Got Dirt? Photo Contest and start writing captions.

Posted by Staff |

SCA’s New Hampshire Conservation Corps, with some help from SCA staff, spent the day at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish New Hampshire, replacing sills supporting a 10-year old wooden bridge. NHCC has been at the Saint-Gaudens for several weeks, building bog bridges, shown here, and doing other important trail maintenance tasks at this extensive woodland site.

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