Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

SCA volunteers and representatives from GTECH harvest sunflower seeds to be converted to biofuels in Pittsburgh. The service project took place as part of the annual National Public Lands Day celebration.This is the twenty-sixth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Staff |

This holiday, give a gift on behalf of conservation. Want a few reasons why? Here are 3 reasons why SCA should be the recipient of your year-end giving. Don’t just take it from us; take it from these three these valuable sources.1. REI says SCA is worth it. That’s right. REI’s flagship Seattle store has made SCA it’s sole recipient of this year’s holiday giving tree.

Posted by Vivian Nguyen |

Today, we got the insider view of some of the struggles the National Park Service is currently facing.

Pedro Ramos, the Big Cypress National Preserve superintendent, came to our campsite and joined us for dinner. After our delicious meal, we gathered around the campfire. He asked us what he can do to improve the National Park System. The main issue was relevance.

Posted by Staff |

Student Conservation Association and American Eagle Outfitters will engage 120 students from colleges across the country in meaningful hands-on conservation service at two of our most environmentally challenged national parks: Everglades National Park and Joshua Tree National Park.

Posted by Staff |

(Above) Sylvie appreciates a belly rub from a visitor. NPS photo.

As the first bus arrives, it starts quietly enough. A single employee from Alaska Geographic, a non-profit organization that sells Alaska-related materials, walks down our driveway to set up shop in the dog yard.

Posted by Staff |

Wheew! So it’s been awhile since I last slowed down to document the many adventures of a Fire Effects Monitoring Intern. But now I’m coming at you full speed with a new one, Central Oregon and the John Day Fossil Beds!

After an eleven hour drive from good old Marblemout, WA, we pull up to our campsite with plenty of day light to spare.

Posted by Venice Wong |

It begins, but who’s to say when it begins. The drive and desire to protect natural spaces, to ensure adequate resources for future generations, to promote the recovery of endangered species while preventing others from becoming threatened, and to simply enjoy something so majestic that man can never hope to recreate it. It’s conservation.

Posted by Staff |

From Theresa Conn on our I Heart Snow Photo Contest. She is an SCA Alumna from 2011.
“My time as an SCA intern last summer at Cape Cod National Seashore has opened up many doors for me- most recently, landing me an internship this winter at New Hampshire State Parks and Recreation as their Parks Blogger.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) This is us working on the mural, getting our groove. You can see me back a ways lining up my stencil!

After our awesome hike on Thursday, we had been tasked with painting a mural at a pier that looks like this:

As you can see, the barriers are not the most beautiful things to look at.

Posted by Staff |

One of the biggest perks of working at a national Wildlife Refuge as an SCA intern is the amount of opportunities available outside of the job description. Everyone at the Refuge, my supervisor in particular, have been incredibly supportive and active in making sure that I have a real taste of what’s available to me in the Service.

Posted by Staff |

Some weeks you’ve got to move boxes. Moving is one of those inevitably dreadful tasks that we all must undertake throughout our lives. It gets even more interesting when the stuff your moving isn’t yours and the stuff was packed by yet another person. That’s the situation we’ve been in this week up at Schoodic. Unfortunately the construction up here took longer than planned.

Posted by Staff |

This morning representatives from the Walmart Foundation, and the Student Conservation Association (SCA), together with the Friends of the Forest Preserves celebrated the launch of SCA’s Conservation Leadership Corps in Chicago. The CLC willl engage 60 local high school students in conservation service, environmental education, and green jobs training.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Conservation Caption Competition, Round 4, go!There must be a tale behind why this SCA member is running around a parking lot wrapped snugly in a mummy bag… Clue us in with your best caption (either here or on Facebook) by 5 PM EST on Monday 5/20.

Posted by Staff |

Andon Zebal (SCA ‘08) recently sent me this blog entry recounting his SCA experience.  Andon grew up in Mexico and hopes to return there to work on sustainable forestry and reforestation. This summer, he will embark on a “Reforestation Backpacking Trip,” attempting to see as many  projects as possible as he travels through Mexico and Central America. You can follow his adventures (including his SCA experience last summer) at his blog, Restoring the Americas.Justin, John and I visited the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in northern Oklahoma. The preserve is the largest protected prairie remnant in the world. I assumed it was a national or at least a state park, but it turns out the whole thing is run by the Nature Conservancy! We met with Bob Hamilton (in between Justin and me in the picture below), basically the ecosystem manager of the preserve. He has been working with the preserve since before it started in 1989, so the Prairie is basically his baby.

by Greg Kinman

Posted by Greg Kinman |

Hello! I’m Greg, from Dallas, Texas, and I’m working as a Photo Media Intern for Alaska’s Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve this summer. I’m based out of Fairbanks, but I fly to the preserve, located in the eastern Alaskan Interior, for each of my four ten-day-or-so backcountry patrols.

Yes, I know that’s a long way to travel just for a summer internship.

Posted by Staff |

Originally featured on American Eagle Outfitters’ blog Made to Last. This guest blog post was written by Claire W., Associate Design Director at American Eagle Outfitters. Claire participated in SCA’s Alternative Spring Break this March with college students from across the country.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) Education Department: Summer 2012

As the summer season quickly comes to a close, everybody in the park can feel the shifting of gears.

Posted by Staff |

Watch veteran SCA crewleader Dan Eldridge use a zip line to get back and forth between 2 crews in Denali National Park in August.

Posted by Staff |

Since all work and no play makes Alternative Spring Break the dull boy, today our crew spent the day enjoying all that Joshua Tree National Park offers its 1.7 million annual guests. After splitting into two groups, half of our team went rock climbing, and half went on a tour of Key’s Ranch.

Posted by Staff |

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