Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

After a restful Wednesday, my fellow campers and I visited Rio Sierra Vista State Park — one of only 5 Mediterranean climates in the world alongside the Mediterranean Basin, Chile, Southern Australia and South Africa. To say the least it was a rare sight to behold.

There were rolling hills, for miles it appeared, and expanses of dense green.

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View More 2010 SCA Earth Day Photos

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(Above) This is an example poster I designed when proposing the TerraCycle project to my supervisors.

Outside of working hours, I’ve been keeping busy to take advantage of all that Florida has to offer. I have already enjoyed several theme parks and aquariums, the beach (have to remind myself it’s saltwater and not freshwater like the Great Lakes!), and exploring downtown Tampa and St.

Posted by Staff |

SCA Senior Vice President Flip Hagood will deliver the opening address at the Wilderness Risk Management Conference in Portland, OR in October.

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2009 work skills training at Salmon-Challis National Forest in Idaho. Photo via the SCA facebook group.This is the twenty-eighth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

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The Florida National Scenic Trail is more than 1,400 miles long, extends the length of the state, connects Florida wilderness areas and unique habitats, and provides low impact access to wildlife and amazing migrating birds.

Posted by Staff |

The Houston crew started off first thing Monday morning with orientation at the office. Everyone was able to meet for the first time, learn the names of tools they’d be using and learn what projects they will be doing in the next six weeks. Orientation also gave students a chance to get a feel for what they would be doing out in the field.

Posted by Staff |

A lot has happened in the past 2 weeks. The Piping Plover chick watches ended July 11th so now we just do routine checks on them every day. They seem to have done well this year with around 25 chicks on our three beaches. They are still as cute as ever but are getting to be pretty big. Seven on Crescent Beach have already fledged.

Posted by Carolyn Lucey |

For the last four years I’ve lived as a college student in New York City. I knew I wanted to spend my last summer here exploring and appreciating this crazy, vibrant, unexpected city.

Posted by Eliza Stokes |

Baltimore Meets the Alaskan Wilderness- It’s Hard to See, But I’m Wearing an Orioles Baseball Cap!

“I have no idea what I’m gonna do this summer,” I told my friend Andrew as we sat on his couch this past winter break. “Do an SCA internship,” he said.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) The students ham it up for Dan, not that they don’t act like that on a regular basis!

Week II and the epic struggle against poison oak continues. Not to beat a dead horse, but poison oak seems to be a ruling factor in our lives right now. The first victim, our very own Richard (aka Lake aka Lagos aka Fuego) was the first to fall.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

On the morning of November 2nd, with transportation still down across New York City, over 100 volunteers — including SCA alums — made their way to Hudson River Park on the Manhattan waterfront to help with the clean-up effort. Some peddled up on bicycles, others came on foot from as far away as Brooklyn and Queens.

Posted by Staff |

I absolutely love this time of year when we get pictures like these. SCA’s Urban Tree house project offers outdoor education to DC school children of all ages and takes place at the outdoor center at Anacostia Park. They learn and they have a great time, as you can see.

Posted by Staff |

Jeff Chen, SCA alumni council co-chair, was featured on NBC Nightly News last week for helping America clean up its act.
Jeff co-founded Pick Up America after an idea he got during his SCA internship at Yosemite. As an intern, Jeff was hiking up Half Dome when he saw litter on the trail.

Posted by Staff |

Wheew! So it’s been awhile since I last slowed down to document the many adventures of a Fire Effects Monitoring Intern. But now I’m coming at you full speed with a new one, Central Oregon and the John Day Fossil Beds!

After an eleven hour drive from good old Marblemout, WA, we pull up to our campsite with plenty of day light to spare.

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This is the eighth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.Environmental Education at the Urban Treehouse, Washington DC. Photo taken 7/25/2008

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Base camp is where climbers begin their climb on Mount McKinley, the tallest mountain in North America at 20,320 ft. Base camp is at 7,200 ft on the Kahiltna Glacier. Denali National Park and Preserve Mountaineering Rangers from the Talkeetna Ranger Station are camped here during the climbing season from late April until early July.

Posted by Jon Whiting |

First and foremost, I hate geese.

They are just terrible, god awful things. Last year they pooped all over my porch and attacked me during my morning jog on the regular.

But I’m not going to mention these vile creatures in this post. No sir.

I’m going to talk about their total opposites, waterfowlnesswise: Ducks. Lovely ducks.

Posted by Staff |

Okay. So. Now that I have obtained the pictures to prove it, I will tell you all about the awesome outreach project I’ve worked on for much of my internship… a project which has finally been project-ed onto some kids!
You see, the brain behind my internship was Jeff Heys, formerly a Habitat Restoration Biologist at the Anchorage Fish and Wildlife Field Office.

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