Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

At first it was simple. As we marched from the road through the desert, there was a small Sahara Mustard here, a small one over there, but really not many. With about one invasive plant per ten SCA volunteers, it wasn’t really much of a job. I was just letting my guard down, only to navigate around a creosote bush and BAM.

Posted by Staff |

Elizabeth Titus Putnam and the Student Conservation Association

“As a twenty-year old Vassar College student in 1953, Elizabeth Titus Putnam was inspired by her experience of the aurora borealis in Grand Teton National Park to create a modern-day conservation corps for students. She used her connections and entrepreneurial instincts to make it happen.

Posted by Staff |

So my first official night was a success, but I’m not going to lie, I was a little scared. A thunderstorm rolled in around 1:30AM and took the power out for a couple of minutes.The entire bunkhouse was pitch black. On the brighter side, I should be able to conquer my fear of the dark this summer!I am in Lake Charles now, looking around and taking in everything Louisianan.

Posted by Staff |

Photos by Justin Poehnelt - SCA Project Leader

Posted by Venice Wong |

It begins, but who’s to say when it begins. The drive and desire to protect natural spaces, to ensure adequate resources for future generations, to promote the recovery of endangered species while preventing others from becoming threatened, and to simply enjoy something so majestic that man can never hope to recreate it. It’s conservation.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) This is us working on the mural, getting our groove. You can see me back a ways lining up my stencil!

After our awesome hike on Thursday, we had been tasked with painting a mural at a pier that looks like this:

As you can see, the barriers are not the most beautiful things to look at.

Posted by Staff |

SCA Senior Vice President Flip Hagood will deliver the opening address at the Wilderness Risk Management Conference in Portland, OR in October.

Posted by Staff |

The Florida National Scenic Trail is more than 1,400 miles long, extends the length of the state, connects Florida wilderness areas and unique habitats, and provides low impact access to wildlife and amazing migrating birds.

Posted by Staff |

Erryday I’m shovelin’. (Shovelin’, shovelin’.)

Shovelin’ out the Harding Icefield Trail, that is—scooping snow out of the track, piling it on switchbacks or trampled vegetation to protect plants and the trail from erosion.

Posted by Staff |

Dawn had hardly broken and two hikers had broken their wrists on icy South Kaibab Trail at Grand Canyon NP. At the same time, the one-time parking lot SCA’s Alternative Spring Break team was to reveg was still covered in snow, so: activate Plan B.

Posted by Staff |

One of the great things about working for a park in the National Capital Region is the number of park service sites in such close proximity to one another- 46 to be exact!

Posted by Staff |

This trailer for a soon-to-be released film called Mother Nature’s Child caught our attention and we hope it engages yours. Please tell you what you think.

Posted by Staff |

So I went hiking through the forest the other day on Bulls Island.

Beautiful is all I can say! I’ve never experienced such a place that was so beautiful and preserved in its original state. The way the trees bristled and the way the pines stretched for what seemed like miles above my head.

Posted by Staff |

This is the twenty-second entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Emmet Pruss |

The tag on my hammock reads “Step 1 Relax.” There are no other steps; it’s a succinct instruction.

And a decent one to keep in mind at work—not just trail work, all work. All not work, too, in fact.

On our hitch at Mt. Greylock, John takes deep breaths between sips of this morning’s coffee. He has an interview at 5 PM.

Posted by Staff |

I’m already 7 months into my fellowship and time has flown. A year ago, I never would have pictured myself living in a National Forest in Florida being a conservationist for the Student Conservation Association. I started this journey in Atlanta, Georgia after graduating with a major in recreation. I have always had a passion for recreation. I want to help everyone enjoy the great outdoors.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

On the morning of November 2nd, with transportation still down across New York City, over 100 volunteers — including SCA alums — made their way to Hudson River Park on the Manhattan waterfront to help with the clean-up effort. Some peddled up on bicycles, others came on foot from as far away as Brooklyn and Queens.

Posted by Staff |

Jeff Chen, SCA alumni council co-chair, was featured on NBC Nightly News last week for helping America clean up its act.
Jeff co-founded Pick Up America after an idea he got during his SCA internship at Yosemite. As an intern, Jeff was hiking up Half Dome when he saw litter on the trail.

Posted by Staff |

Art, education, and community made a comeback at the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center this weekend. It was “Return to Prairie Days” (a Fergus Falls Signature Event, proclaims the town’s event calendar), bringing students, artists, locals and outsiders to the refuge for a pageant, duck banding, butterfly tagging, and prairie planting.

Pages