Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

LOCATION: South Side Park DATE & TIME: Saturday, October 23, 10am-3pmEVENT RECAP: 12 CLC students, 7 staff and former crew leaders, and 11 neighborhood volunteers attended what turned out to be a sunshine and energy-filled workday in South Side Park in Pittsburgh’s South Side Slopes neighborhood.

Posted by Staff |

In keeping with the application of much of our free time around camp, I’ll lead off today’s post with a trivia question: what weighs five pounds, looks like a pair of pie plates, and likes to hide next to Yuccas, under bushes, and in holes? Answer: the desert tortoise.

Posted by Staff |

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Posted by Staff |

The taller buildings of St. Cloud are replaced by warehouses, then sheds and barns as the bus plugs on towards the Pothole Prairie region of western Minnesota. The trees, broad, bright and bushy from the near-solstice days, are interspersed by ponds and meadows.

Posted by Staff |

This is the ninth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.Katrina Recovery Project, Waveland, Mississippi, 6/11/2007 - I found this polaroid in the mud near the site of where a group of SCA Volunteers were building a brand new house for a local family.

Posted by Eliza Stokes |

Baltimore Meets the Alaskan Wilderness- It’s Hard to See, But I’m Wearing an Orioles Baseball Cap!

“I have no idea what I’m gonna do this summer,” I told my friend Andrew as we sat on his couch this past winter break. “Do an SCA internship,” he said.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) The students ham it up for Dan, not that they don’t act like that on a regular basis!

Week II and the epic struggle against poison oak continues. Not to beat a dead horse, but poison oak seems to be a ruling factor in our lives right now. The first victim, our very own Richard (aka Lake aka Lagos aka Fuego) was the first to fall.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

SCA’s caption quality evaluation intern*, Danielle Thompson, has selected her favorite of this week’s captions.BEHOLD. Congratulations to Greg Jackson for coming up with the winner. Greg, keep an eye out for the postman; your prize is in the mail.This round of the Conservation Caption Competition, Fall 2012 Edition, has been brought to you by SCA national partner Dr Pepper Snapple Group.

Posted by Staff |

Do you care about the future of youth conservation services?Then help protect and expand them.Call, write, and email your Congressman today and ask them to co-sponsor The Youth Corps Act of 2011 (H.R.

Posted by Staff |

At first, the idea that the upcoming work week was to be spent solely in the fire office in Marblemount was kind of a drag. After all the cool places we had traveled to around the North Cascades National Park, we were going nowhere this week but back and forth between computer desks.

Posted by Staff |

By Wendy Liscow, Program Officer, The Geraldine R. Dodge FoundationOne warm, crystal clear morning in August, I was lacing up my hiking boots with great anticipation.

Posted by Staff |

Time has absolutely flown by. I cannot believe that I have little over a month left with my internship. I swear I just got out of orientation. I was so nervous leaving home to go to the National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia.

Needless to say, orientation was a blast. I met so many new people and learned so many neat things.

Posted by Staff |

1977 Youth Conservation Corps backcountry work crew on the shores of Shoshone Lake. The Student Conservation Association was the staff contractor for the program.

Posted by Jon Whiting |

First and foremost, I hate geese.

They are just terrible, god awful things. Last year they pooped all over my porch and attacked me during my morning jog on the regular.

But I’m not going to mention these vile creatures in this post. No sir.

I’m going to talk about their total opposites, waterfowlnesswise: Ducks. Lovely ducks.

Posted by Staff |

Okay. So. Now that I have obtained the pictures to prove it, I will tell you all about the awesome outreach project I’ve worked on for much of my internship… a project which has finally been project-ed onto some kids!
You see, the brain behind my internship was Jeff Heys, formerly a Habitat Restoration Biologist at the Anchorage Fish and Wildlife Field Office.

Posted by Staff |

Source: National Parks Traveler - ‘Postcard From The Backbone Of The Continent: Days Of Discovery At Glacier National Park’ by SCA Intern Ashley AlvarezEditor’s note: Ashley Alvarez an intern with the Student Conservation Association, spent her summer working in Glacier National Park in Montana.

Posted by Staff |

SCA has been a proud partner of AmeriCorps since the latter was founded in 1993. Each year, thousands of SCA members serve America’s public lands in collaboration with AmeriCorps.

Posted by Staff |

At the fire hall, tension crackled. In between gleaming fire engines, volunteers in rain gear and torn flannel murmured to each other, speculating about the lost racer—where he was last seen, what he was wearing, where he might have gone off the narrow race trail and into the bush.

Posted by Staff |

I’m sitting here in a park cafeteria that won’t open for another hour, the lights down low and a couple of staffers puttering about. Five for Fighting’s “What Kind of World Do You Want?” is coming out of the ceiling speakers.

Posted by Staff |

The Minnesota Odonata Survey, represented by its founder and most endearing expert, visited the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center (PWLC) this past Saturday. Kurt Mead, a master naturalist and author of the most comprehensive guides to Minnesota Dragonflies and Damselflies (Order Odonata) was holding a workshop on the refuge.

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