Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

From the Mount Rainier National Park Volunteer Newsletter September 2012.
We would like to highlight a special intern this summer to help show how much the park relies on and appreciates our volunteers. The east side Backcountry Intern through the Student Conservation Association, Kris Youtz, was first on scene to an emergency call in the Glacier Basin area in the past month.

Posted by Staff |

Generally, when we think of science we think of lab coats and test tubes. Sparkling, sterile laboratories where PhDs churn out new truths. At least when it comes to most environmental sciences this is not the case. While a large part of science will always take place in the lab, it has to start in the field.

Posted by Staff |

Posted by Staff |

If you’re in New York this month, make sure to check out this awesome Alternative Spring Break billboard at the American Eagle Outfitters store in Times Square. The 15,000 square foot LED display will run images from Alternative Spring Break four times per hour for the entire month of March. Thanks to American Eagle Outfitters for giving us some bright lights in the big city!

Posted by Deb Keller |

The trees were chosen for their ability to tolerate climate change. The footbridges were anchored by cables to withstand floods. The guest of honor?

Posted by Staff |

I arrived at Grand Canyon a day ahead of the ASB crew (on my own dime, auditors!).

Posted by Venice Wong |

For a small change of pace, the National Park Service led us to Upper Zuma Canyon. Despite a new location with greenery that was vaguely reminiscent of the forests of Washington, our task for the day was a classic conservation work: removing invasives This time we took on the poison hemlock and Italian thistle.

Posted by Staff |

by Kevin Hamilton, web teamSCA marked the occasion by hosting President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, and former President Bill Clinton at a native tree planting project at Washington, D.C.’s Kenilworth Aquatic Garden, just minutes after Mr. Obama signed into law the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act.  I was assigned to cover the event.  Yah… just another day at the office.

Posted by Staff |

I became an SCA intern at the beginning of the summer with the charge of assessing the invasive lionfish population in Biscayne National Park. Lionfish are quickly taking over coral reefs in the Caribbean, eating as many tiny fish and invertebrates as possible – including commercially important juvenile fish (the ones that provide people with a living and food).

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

On the third weekend of October of this year, the Outdoor Nation San Francisco Summit brought together young outdoorsmen from all over the US to encourage them to lead their peers off of the couch and into the foliage. SCA’s Alumni Council gathered at the event to play a special role: Highlighting the fact that an active outdoor lifestyle is the perfect precursor to a career in conservation.

Posted by Staff |

The season of giving is upon us and, with it, the opportunity to celebrate all those who give of themselves to preserve and extend our rich natural and cultural heritage. This, of course, includes the young women and men of SCA, the generous patrons who support them, and the resource managers who guide them.

Posted by Daniel Ramirez |

Members of the SCA International high school crew take a ferry to the trailhead. They will work and camp about 6 miles up the valley behind them – the Big Beaver drainage.

Have you ever seen a zipline through a forest? If you said yes, then it’s probably one of those ultra-touristy, charge-people-a-lot-of-money-to-have-the-chance-to-fly-through-the-trees type of deals.

Posted by Staff |

For our last day of work we headed out to the Hole-in-the-Donut, a former agricultural area where invasive plants like Brazilian pepper have overtaken the native habitat. Our worksite was a large artificially formed mound that would barely count as a hill in the north, but which towered over the flat Everglades like a small mountain.

Posted by Staff |

Before you begin following us this summer, we’d like you to meet the entire Valley Forge Crew. Here we are. The names, faces and basic info about us. The next step is bringing you along on our summer journey.

Posted by Staff |

SCA interns throughout the Gulf region are scrambling to conduct wildlife mortality surveys and establish baseline data before the oil takes a larger toll on area wetlands and beaches, including at Pelican Islands National Wildlife Refuge on the eastern coast of Florida. Read more

Posted by Tishena Gillis |

Hello everyone! Before I get into the details of my internship with the Army Corps of Engineers, I’d like to tell you how I spent my Independence Day. While I’m sure the majority of you cooked out, set off massive amounts of fireworks, or simply enjoyed your day off work, my crew and I opted for a less traditional approach and had a gardening extravaganza to offset the beginning of summer.

Posted by Staff |

Acadia National Park, ME - Summer 2007 - Photos by Crew Members This is the 31-38 (we got a little behind, time to catch up!) entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Staff |

As my internship at Fire Island National Seashore comes to a close, I was lucky enough to have two “employee enrichment” days - or as I like to call them, field trips!

Posted by Staff |

What was truly astounding about spending today with SCA in DC was the palpable spirit of service. In a moment of clarity amid the bustle and energy of the day, I realized just how much we were embodying the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr.

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