Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

To celebrate the first week of school, SCA Manchester’s Conservation Leadership Corps recently took a trip to Vermont for a tour of the University of Vermont and a visit to Knoll Farm. Leaving shortly after school ended, we made the 3 hour journey up to Jericho Research Forest, a piece of land owned by UVM and used as a part of many classes.

Posted by Venice Wong |

The second day at Malibu Lagoon State Beach we continued our invasives battle. A small group kayaked out to one of the further islands to do work. One problem. There were only two kayaks available so ASB members had to be ferried out two at a time - a hilarious scene to behold.

Posted by Staff |

Sometimes its a little too easy to get caught up in what you don’t have. For me currently, the big ones are internet, cell service, and the ability to make it to the coffee pot before my twelve other bunkmates do.

Posted by Staff |

SCA Senior Vice President Flip Hagood will deliver the opening address at the Wilderness Risk Management Conference in Portland, OR in October.

Posted by Staff |

By Ron HasselSo the week’s over, and everyone’s starting to pack for the trip home. One would think that this ending would have a sad undertone, but the reality is that everyone is excited at about all they have accomplished.

Posted by Staff |

The Florida National Scenic Trail is more than 1,400 miles long, extends the length of the state, connects Florida wilderness areas and unique habitats, and provides low impact access to wildlife and amazing migrating birds.

Posted by Staff |

We left our camp this morning before the sun rose because we had a two hour drive to our worksite of the day, Lake Chekika. After meeting the other park volunteers who would be working with us, we stopped at a pond to see a pair of large alligators and several generations of their babies basking on rocks.

Posted by Staff |

Here’s a video of our crew meeting for the first time at the airport. Hopefully, it’ll give you a sense of how a handful of young strangers can quickly become an essential support network for each other. Looking forward to the summer ahead!

Posted by Emmet Pruss |

The Connecticut River gluts flatly into the horizon, viewed from the observation deck atop Mt. Sugarloaf in Deerfield, Massachusetts. Church steeples from small towns freckle the foothills, the spaces between them carpeted under humid shags of exhaling trees.

Posted by Jacqueline Keating |

Where are you from? Sounds like a simple question, right?

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) Cassin takes in the aroma of flowers grown from the compost he helped create. NPS photo.

The dogs in the Denali National Park kennels produce up to 50 pounds of poo a day. That’s the same weight as some of our sled dogs! In 1980, the kennels staff decided that launching all that poo down the hill behind the kennels building probably wasn’t the greatest idea.

Posted by Staff |

SCA Detroit removes invasives, plants trees, learns about conservation, makes new friends, works really hard, and has a great time.Thanks Johnson Controls for your support.
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Posted by Staff |

Source: The WashCycle, October 31, 2012The Student Conservation Association, in conjunction with DDOT and NPS, performed hundreds of hours of service maintaining trails, removing trash and removing invasive species.SCA also partnered with the District Department of Transportation for the second year which helped fund 4 crews and 22 students in District parks and green spaces this summer.

Posted by Staff |

By Marnie Miller-KeasLast fall 10 acres of Phragmites australis, an invasive plant also known as common reed, was sprayed with herbicide in attempts to reclaim Iona Marsh with cattail and other native plants. Extensive bird surveys have been done over the past years and as Phragmites has increased in dominance, bird species richness has decreased.

Posted by Staff |

Written by guest blogger Micah Berman, ‘11 SCA National Crew, while in Alaska. Micah was a high school graduating Senior from New Hampshire during this trip. He is currently a Freshman at the University of Vermont.
As I’m sitting here next to this peaceful lake, way up in the back country of Alaska, I realize that I am at home.

Posted by Staff |

This morning we met at the park headquarters and mixed up a batch of herbicide to spray for invasive Cattail and Reed Canary. After loading up our sprayers and numerous bottles of herbicide we piled in the truck and made our way to the site. We started off driving on HWY 12 along the stretch that wraps around the southern region of Lake Michigan.

Posted by Staff |

Alligator tagging; these two words contain a mix of emotions as they ring in my ear. Fear, excitement, anxiety, insane, crazy… I had never even seen an alligator until this summer, and now I have the opportunity to catch them in their own territory!? Crazy.

A couple nights ago, I actually partook in this adventure.

Posted by Apoorva Mahajan |

When I first got word of my summer internship in Grand Teton, I couldn’t have been more excited. But there was one nagging doubt on my mind. As an Interpretation intern, I understood that I would wear a number of hats. The one role that gave me some worry, however, was having to present programs. In front of large audiences. All by myself.

by Andrea Willingham

Posted by Andrea Willingham |

What kind of natural environment did you grow up in? Have you ever considered how it might have affected the way you see the world today?

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