Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

One of the biggest perks of working at a national Wildlife Refuge as an SCA intern is the amount of opportunities available outside of the job description. Everyone at the Refuge, my supervisor in particular, have been incredibly supportive and active in making sure that I have a real taste of what’s available to me in the Service.

Posted by Staff |

Some weeks you’ve got to move boxes. Moving is one of those inevitably dreadful tasks that we all must undertake throughout our lives. It gets even more interesting when the stuff your moving isn’t yours and the stuff was packed by yet another person. That’s the situation we’ve been in this week up at Schoodic. Unfortunately the construction up here took longer than planned.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Conservation Caption Competition, Round 4, go!There must be a tale behind why this SCA member is running around a parking lot wrapped snugly in a mummy bag… Clue us in with your best caption (either here or on Facebook) by 5 PM EST on Monday 5/20.

Posted by Staff |

Written by Jeff Chen, SCA ‘06 and Alumni Council member.For the last three years of my life, I’ve walked and picked up roadside litter with my crew of trash gypsies.

Posted by Staff |

We begin by rubbing our fingers together. The sound, imperceptible, is obscured by a light breeze and the occasional bird overhead. Next, we snap our fingers. It’s hard in the cold, but the sound is persistent, an organized cacophony. Better still is the light clapping. The tips of our fingers on our right hands meet the palms of our left. With 42 campers the rhythm is undeniable.

Posted by Staff |

This post is by the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest Veteran’s Fire Corps, Fall 2011

The first week began with James departing for Texas on a fire assignment. It was a great opportunity for him to work closely with a local fire crew and experience the incident command system found on fire assignments.

Posted by Staff |

I woke up this morning to discover that my roommate and fellow SCA intern had somehow broken her toe – unfortunately she was in charge of picking up some important visitors to the park, so my crew and I had to step in and leave behind our normal daily duties of implementing vegetation plots to drive down about 20 miles on the beach to the Fire Island lighthouse to pick up the guests.

Posted by Staff |

SCA’s New York Green Corps initiative launches next week with a six-week summer youth employment program. Nearly 200 youth members will join skilled SCA crew leaders for projects in state parks across New York.

Posted by Staff |

For some, spring break begins with moving into a posh hotel room in Florida and settling in for a week of tanning- but for the SCA spring break group, it began with a late-night arrival at our campground, fumbling around in the dark introducing themselves to people they couldn’t even see. The first-night dinner, sesame noodles with tofu or chicken, was amazing.

Posted by Staff |

I absolutely love this time of year when we get pictures like these. SCA’s Urban Tree house project offers outdoor education to DC school children of all ages and takes place at the outdoor center at Anacostia Park. They learn and they have a great time, as you can see.

Posted by Staff |

This is the eighth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.Environmental Education at the Urban Treehouse, Washington DC. Photo taken 7/25/2008

Posted by Jacqueline Keating |
Sunrise at Delicate Arch

I felt like a four year old dragging my feet through the sand and pouting despite the fact that I was in one of the most beautiful places in the country and had just witnessed a breathtaking sunrise at Delicate Arch. One of my friends was visiting from the east coast, so on my much-needed day off I agreed to spend the morning in the park and found myself regretting it immediately.

Posted by Staff |

If anyone had told me a year ago that I would spend spring break 2012 planting seedlings on a burned out hillside, yanking weeds from a sandy desert basin, or counting turtles in Southern California, I would probably have been skeptical; but, as things have turned out, this has been a great week.

Posted by Staff |

A lot has happened in the past 2 weeks. The Piping Plover chick watches ended July 11th so now we just do routine checks on them every day. They seem to have done well this year with around 25 chicks on our three beaches. They are still as cute as ever but are getting to be pretty big. Seven on Crescent Beach have already fledged.

Posted by Staff |

ALASKA IS HOME TO HALF this nation’s wilderness, yet for many Native youth it remains The Last Frontier.

Posted by Jon Whiting |

Let me tell y’all about some wildlife right quick.

Mississippi, or as I like to call it “Sippiland,” is a state teeming with various species-of animal and human-that I’ve never before had the pleasure of meeting. Or displeasure, in reference to these irritating mosquitoes.

Posted by Staff |

Michael assisted with Environmental Management System certification, improving Asilomar’s sustainable food and beverage program, and strengthening waste diversion efforts. At the end of his internship, he was hired as an Environmental and Purchasing Manager with ARAMARK at Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Posted by Staff |

This past weekend, Hudson River Park hosted an educational event dubbed “Science on the River”. On Saturday, one of our piers was transformed into an environmental education extravaganza. Several organizations converged to educate the public on core sampling, fish of the Hudson River, benthic invertebrates, sponge parks, oysters, and we had an SCA table too!

Posted by Staff |

Elizabeth Titus Putnam and the Student Conservation Association

“As a twenty-year old Vassar College student in 1953, Elizabeth Titus Putnam was inspired by her experience of the aurora borealis in Grand Teton National Park to create a modern-day conservation corps for students. She used her connections and entrepreneurial instincts to make it happen.

Posted by Staff |

Photos by Justin Poehnelt - SCA Project Leader

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