Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

By Wendy Liscow, Program Officer, The Geraldine R. Dodge FoundationOne warm, crystal clear morning in August, I was lacing up my hiking boots with great anticipation.

Posted by Staff |

Climbing Mount McKinley: The Program

The program was developed by an SCA intern a few years ago. It included a simulation of climbing Mount McKinley. One of the interpretation coaches wrote up her program into a “template” so that it could be presented by other interpreters after she left. The template was further developed last year by another SCA intern and a seasonal interpretation ranger.

Posted by Staff |

1977 Youth Conservation Corps backcountry work crew on the shores of Shoshone Lake. The Student Conservation Association was the staff contractor for the program.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Of the thousand plus Conservation Internships that we have posted right now, these are, in our expert opinion, the 10 most unbelievably cool. Have a look at the list and decide for yourself. Best decide fast, though. Internships this awesome won’t stay open for long.Complete an application and apply for as many as you like today.10.

Everybody likes an “Atta Boy.” And after three years of SCA service projects in the Allegheny National Forest, District Ranger Rob Fallon gave the SCA a tremendous “Atta Boy” last week. “We signed a $1.2 million contract with the SCA (3 years ago).

Posted by Staff |

Dr. Martin Luther King said “all labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance.” SCA members, alumni, staff and volunteers stayed true to that message on MLK Day.

Posted by Staff |

(Photo above) Gaiters, carhartts, and a tucked in shirt-check!

There’s an island out in Narragansett Bay. Recorded at over 200 acres, this island is uninhabited by humans.

Posted by Staff |

I’m sitting here in a park cafeteria that won’t open for another hour, the lights down low and a couple of staffers puttering about. Five for Fighting’s “What Kind of World Do You Want?” is coming out of the ceiling speakers.

Posted by Staff |

It occurred to me after I finished yesterday’s post that you might wonder just how we went about planting trees across that burned out ridge. Since we spent today “plowing” the same ground, I decided to provide a step by step explanation of just what goes in to planting a Joshua Tree.

Step One
Dig a Hole.
It sounds simple, but, here in the desert, the ground fights back.

Posted by Staff |

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Posted by Staff |

Hi, my name’s Alexis and I’ve been stationed at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. I’ve been doing Reed Canary Grass surveys and forest inventory for about a month now. In the Reed Canary Grass survey we go to meadows infested with Reed Canary Grass-an invasive species-and compare different treatment methods for getting rid of it.

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