Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

Congratulations to Amy Brown on winning the 2011 E3 Washington Award of Excellence in the Informal Educator category! She is an SCA Alumnus and a long-time partner with SCA in the North Cascades WILD partnership. Check out the full story and photos from the ceremony.

Posted by Madalee Haines |

Hanging upside down in the desert It feels like a while since my last update, but perhaps that’s been because I’ve been doing quite a bit of exploring since first arriving here in Moab, Utah. Arriving in Moab: now that’s a picture I’d like to paint for you.

Posted by Staff |

Hello…my name is Whitney Kempfert and I am from Minnesootah. I grew up in the twin cities, but some of the best times in my life have been spent outdoors and in National Parks.

Posted by Staff |

All Corps Retreat took place at Camp Long in West Seattle from Saturday, January 8 to Sunday, January 9, 2011 and was attended by 47 youth and 8 staff. Students participated in a service project, led team-building games, had small group time, did leadership activities, and put on a student run panel about future conservation opportunities.

Posted by Staff |

Grace captioned this photo: “Century Mark! Hiked 100 miles in less than 30 days!”

Posted by Staff |

This is the eleventh entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.This photo is from the 2008 SCA Photo Contest and was taken by SCA Members in Denali National Park.

Posted by Tavon Betts |

Today was my first full day with the Student Conservation Association, and already I know this will be a memorable experience. I traveled from Atlanta, with a layover flight in Las Vegas, then to Burbank, CA. At the Burbank airport I was greeted by jovial and enthusiastic participants, project leader, and staff.

Posted by Staff |

I’ve been trudging and mucking around in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge for almost two months (!) now.

Posted by Staff |

As you likely know, Hurricane Sandy - a large and potentially destructive storm - is impacting the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast part of the eastern seaboard. Widespread rain, flooding, and power outages are anticipated. Thousands of flights are cancelled and many offices (including DC government offices) are closed.

Posted by Staff |

One thing that Jonah Keane’s speech at All Corps last week made me think about is, “the bubble.” The bubble is a term that I have heard a lot since joining SCA NH Corps and I have often wondered why. It’s the kind of thing that you can only realize with a bit of reflection, which is something that I get to do a lot here and with this blog.

Posted by Staff |

Climbing Mount McKinley: The Program

The program was developed by an SCA intern a few years ago. It included a simulation of climbing Mount McKinley. One of the interpretation coaches wrote up her program into a “template” so that it could be presented by other interpreters after she left. The template was further developed last year by another SCA intern and a seasonal interpretation ranger.

Posted by Staff |

Gnar crew finished up our time in the Lake Tahoe area and headed north to the Klamath National Forest, but not before having all you can eat sushi. The sushi chefs got more than they could bargain for with 6 trail crew members coming in fresh off hitch. After we nearly put the sushi place out of business we headed off on our journey.

Posted by Staff |

As the long-term effects of Sandy become more evident, those in need of assistance becomes greater. Check back for updates on ways SCA is getting involved. Follow #SandyVolunteers for up to the minute news on where and how you can help.

More than 1,000 NYC Service volunteers are involved in recovery efforts.

Posted by Staff |

I woke up this morning to discover that my roommate and fellow SCA intern had somehow broken her toe – unfortunately she was in charge of picking up some important visitors to the park, so my crew and I had to step in and leave behind our normal daily duties of implementing vegetation plots to drive down about 20 miles on the beach to the Fire Island lighthouse to pick up the guests.

Posted by Staff |

Generally, when we think of science we think of lab coats and test tubes. Sparkling, sterile laboratories where PhDs churn out new truths. At least when it comes to most environmental sciences this is not the case. While a large part of science will always take place in the lab, it has to start in the field.

Posted by Staff |

Via US Fish and Wildlife Services.
Shelby Lin is a student at Harvard University studying Applied Mathematics with a focus in Environmental Economics. At school she is involved in EnviroEd, a volunteer-run environmental education program, and the Harvard-Radcliffe Women’s Rugby Club.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

56 years ago, a movement began. It was based around the idea that young conservationists would jump at the opportunity to serve their communities, give back to nature, and help conserve our treasured outdoor spaces.When the first group of SCA volunteers reported for work at Olympic National Park, they weren’t there to embody this powerful idea, they were there to save the park.

Posted by Staff |

Removing graffitti and restoring trails on spring break in the Grand Canyon. Thanks, American Eagle Outfitters, for making this possible.Help more SCA members preserve our land for generations to come. Donate now. Sign Up for News & Stories

Posted by Staff |

New Hampshire Conservation Corps members have spent the last several months teaching elementary school students about the environment in the Manchester Public Schools.

Posted by Carolyn Lucey |

Wednesday, June 19, 2013
Carolyn Lucey
The crew woke up early on the first day to bright sunlight in our tents. Birds were shouting from the trees, and a raccoon had gotten into our food stores during the night. Our campsite at Floyd Bennet Field is a leafy, grassy, green oasis that looks rural despite being located in southeastern Brooklyn.

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