Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

As a native of Colorado, the dry, cool climate and adventurous, get-outdoors spirit of Anchorage are welcome characteristics to me as I adapt to my home (thousands of miles) away from home during my 10 month internship working for the Anchorage Fish and Wildlife Field Office.

Posted by Staff |

WFA Training for Crew Leaders by Aerie Backcountry Medicine.

Posted by Staff |

Written by Kate Hagner, SCA’s AmeriCorps Program and Evaluation manager, in celebration of AmeriCorps week, March 9 -17th. SCA and AmeriCorps share a common history: President Roosevelt’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC).

Posted by Staff |

SCA alumna Emily Williams (Kenai, ‘08) sent us this account of her MLK Day experience.  Thanks, Emily!After listening to lectures, filling pipettes in labs, and sitting in classrooms all day, the members of the FAB Environmental Sustainability trip were ready and raring to go get their hands dirty and spend some quality time in the outdoors. On Friday, January 16th, 14 students of the University of Florida in Gainesville piled into two vans and made the two-hour drive to Orlando to volunteer their time and efforts over MLK weekend.

Posted by Staff |

Written by Evan Escamilla, SCA alum ‘10 and ‘11 and current SCA recruiter.What an amazing couple of days it has been here in the Tetons!

Posted by Staff |

Data in, data out. This past week I have thumbed through pages and pages of elevation spreadsheets- processing and organizing points for future conclusions. Data entry is important, and building that breadth of information is so necessary in conservation.

by Greg Kinman

Posted by Greg Kinman |

Nothing inspires a person to conserve the earth’s beauty more than spending time in true wilderness. Josh, my supervisor, and I just returned from a ten-day off-trail backpacking trip through the upland wilderness of Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve in eastern Interior Alaska. We traveled by bush plane, landing on tall grass in an area near Copper Mountain and the upper Charley River.

Posted by Staff |

Captures are the most interesting part of this job, and the best opportunity to improve wildlife field skills. We have done a few captures in the last two weeks. I was involved with two of them, Yellow 70 and Orange 66.

Yellow 70 was a 7-year old male bear that we put a radio collar on. And we finally captured bear 3565.

Posted by Staff |

Wrapping up the first full day of ASB with the Student Conservation Association has been a blast! Here is a quick round up of my past 24 hrs: Flew into Ft.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

Yes! SCA’s very own Graphic Designer, Julia Jandrisits, responsible for our “look” as it appears from our website to our flyers to our Alternative Spring Break T-shirts, has received the G. D.

Posted by Staff |

By Ron HasselSo the week’s over, and everyone’s starting to pack for the trip home. One would think that this ending would have a sad undertone, but the reality is that everyone is excited at about all they have accomplished.

Posted by Staff |

By Nora Kaufmann, SCA Crew Leader
It’s that time of year again. The last traces of spring linger in the air, the birds are chirping, the grass is green, and coffee consumption in the state of New Hampshire skyrockets as the wonderful SCA staff here in Charlestown, New Hampshire prepares for yet another field season.

Posted by Staff |

Izzie Hoffman cutting a branch to anchor in the waterbar with a stake on the Berry Creek Trail in Grand Teton. Grand Tetons High School Crew July 24th-August 22nd, 2008 Photo by Jodi P. ProutThis is the fourteenth entry in our ongoing series, Photograph Fantastique, in which we count down 50 days until the Unofficial Official Start of High Season for conservation programs.

Posted by Daniel Ramirez |

Members of the SCA International high school crew take a ferry to the trailhead. They will work and camp about 6 miles up the valley behind them – the Big Beaver drainage.

Have you ever seen a zipline through a forest? If you said yes, then it’s probably one of those ultra-touristy, charge-people-a-lot-of-money-to-have-the-chance-to-fly-through-the-trees type of deals.

Posted by Staff |

Two good things in one app: find parks near you and support SCA! What more could you ask for?American Park Network, creator of Oh, Ranger!

Posted by Staff |

We spent our second day here in the Everglades cleaning the Long Pine Key campground. It’s on one of the Florida Keys – but it’s not an island at this time of year.

Follow Me: Alternative Spring Break Blog

Posted by Staff |

Photo via carolinabirdclub.org. Woo!

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. (March 18, 2013) — Sandwiched between mangroves, alligators float on the water’s surface, manatees float just below, and a woodpecker works for its lunch: Tck tck tck. Tck Tck Tck.

“This is the woodpecker mecca,” says Ross Scott of Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Posted by Staff |

Alligator tagging; these two words contain a mix of emotions as they ring in my ear. Fear, excitement, anxiety, insane, crazy… I had never even seen an alligator until this summer, and now I have the opportunity to catch them in their own territory!? Crazy.

A couple nights ago, I actually partook in this adventure.

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