Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Posted by Staff |

Written by guest blogger Monica Patel ‘11. Monica is a two-time SCA intern who’s worked on developing wilderness stewardship plans in four different US parks and refuges. Monica’s story was first featured in the Fall 2011 Green Way newsletter.
As 2011 comes to end, I look back at a year of travel, challenges and learning opportunities in wilderness stewardship.

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

56 years ago, a movement began. It was based around the idea that young conservationists would jump at the opportunity to serve their communities, give back to nature, and help conserve our treasured outdoor spaces.When the first group of SCA volunteers reported for work at Olympic National Park, they weren’t there to embody this powerful idea, they were there to save the park.

Posted by Staff |

Photo Credits: Rick Zamore, SCA Program Manager You can read Rick’s short article about Cumberland Island in the February edition of Hands On.

SCA 2012 Allaire State Park & SCA 2013 Clearwater National Forest

Posted by Joseph Thurston |

For 17-year-old SCA alum Jordan Chow, serving a three-week stint with SCA was just the beginning. After his 2012 summer crew position at Allaire State Park in New Jersey, Jordan came home and took a closer look at conservation volunteer opportunities in his own community in Chappaqua, New York.

Posted by Staff |

In keeping with the application of much of our free time around camp, I’ll lead off today’s post with a trivia question: what weighs five pounds, looks like a pair of pie plates, and likes to hide next to Yuccas, under bushes, and in holes? Answer: the desert tortoise.

Posted by Staff |

Photo via Giovanni Paccaloni, Flickr

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. (March 19, 2013) — Nearly everybody here has a story of someone who has driven into a canal. That’s just life in the ‘Glades.

Canals cut along all the roads here; they always have. The roads were made by digging the canals and dumping the dirt to form the roadways.

Posted by Staff |

From Theresa Conn on our I Heart Snow Photo Contest. She is an SCA Alumna from 2011.
“My time as an SCA intern last summer at Cape Cod National Seashore has opened up many doors for me- most recently, landing me an internship this winter at New Hampshire State Parks and Recreation as their Parks Blogger.

Posted by Staff |

The taller buildings of St. Cloud are replaced by warehouses, then sheds and barns as the bus plugs on towards the Pothole Prairie region of western Minnesota. The trees, broad, bright and bushy from the near-solstice days, are interspersed by ponds and meadows.

Posted by Staff |

by Emma Jornlin, SCA SeattleAs I learn more and more about the history of Earth Day, I get the feeling that Gaylord Nelson did not intend for the day to be about blackberries. Yet year after year, for the past five years of my life, Earth Day here in Seattle has always involved this prickly plant.

Posted by Staff |

For our last day of work we headed out to the Hole-in-the-Donut, a former agricultural area where invasive plants like Brazilian pepper have overtaken the native habitat. Our worksite was a large artificially formed mound that would barely count as a hill in the north, but which towered over the flat Everglades like a small mountain.

Posted by Venice Wong |

The second day at Malibu Lagoon State Beach we continued our invasives battle. A small group kayaked out to one of the further islands to do work. One problem. There were only two kayaks available so ASB members had to be ferried out two at a time - a hilarious scene to behold.

Posted by Staff |

Seventeen year old Lakey Peterson is a champion surfer, conservationist, and spokeswoman for SCA. As she competes around the world, Lakey will share her observations of the environments she visits and her work to protect the world’s oceans. To follow her on the pro tour, visit lakeypeterson.com.
 
I have pretty much the coolest job in the world.

Posted by Staff |

Before you begin following us this summer, we’d like you to meet the entire Valley Forge Crew. Here we are. The names, faces and basic info about us. The next step is bringing you along on our summer journey.

Posted by Staff |

Sometimes its a little too easy to get caught up in what you don’t have. For me currently, the big ones are internet, cell service, and the ability to make it to the coffee pot before my twelve other bunkmates do.

Posted by Staff |

Watch the video below, then pledge to take part this summer by signing the Conservation Declaration. Our goal is to reach 5,000 signatures by Monday, June 22nd - the launch of the president’s United We Serve campaign. Once you’ve signed, you’ll be entered to win a National Parks Annual Pass!

Posted by Staff |

Welcome to SCA’s new website! Take a look around and let us know what you think by leaving a comment on this blog post.What do you like? What would you change? What’s missing?We want to hear from you!P.S… While you’re here, make sure you sign up to receive Hands On, our monthly electronic newsletter.  It’s the best way to stay up-to-date with SCA!

Posted by Staff |

“EPMT training, day four: Today, I pulled out baby trees by the roots and left them by the side of the road to die. And I feel great about it.” I pulled a mock sad face.

One of the biotechs working in eastern Alaska laughed. “You should totally feel great about doing some good for the ecosystem.” She hefted a bright orange weed wrench and grinned.

Posted by Emmet Pruss |

The Connecticut River gluts flatly into the horizon, viewed from the observation deck atop Mt. Sugarloaf in Deerfield, Massachusetts. Church steeples from small towns freckle the foothills, the spaces between them carpeted under humid shags of exhaling trees.

Posted by Staff |

View as a slideshow on the SCA flickr

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