SCA Alaska

Flowers blooming in Alaska where SCA is busy working

SCA Alaska

Alaska is an SCA “region” unto itself with more than 325 million acres of public land – more than half this nation’s wilderness.  SCA is working to ensure Alaska Native youth remain connected with their natural resources, culture and heritage by forging youth-focused networks of government agencies, Alaska Native corporations, and local organizations. 

Either in spite of, or because of, vast geographically spances and low populations, collaboration with complimentary organizations and programs is key to creating meaningful opportunities for all of SCA’s members.

In recent years, this collaborative effort has achieved a four-fold increase in the number of Alaskan Native teens participating in habitat protection, trail construction, and historic restoration.  And with their new-found skills and experience, many SCA alumni are advancing to conservation careers, with our agency partners particularly eager to bring on diverse, young employees reflective of the community at large.

Find out Information about our Alaska Corps Teams

Youth served:

  • 270 (average)

Key initiatives:

Primary partners:

  • U.S. Forest Service Alaska Region
  • NPS Alaska Region
  • The National Ecological Observatory Network
  • Municipality of Anchorage - Girdwood Parks and Trails
  • Alaska Geographic

Leading supporters:

  • Cook Inlet Region, Inc. - CIRI Alaska Native Crew
  • ConocoPhillips - Alaska Youth Programs
  • Bristol Bay Native Corporation - BBNC Alaska Native Crew
  • Iditarod National Historic Trail Alliance
  • Alaska Airlines Foundation

News, Stories & Projects

Before this summer, I had never laid eyes on a brown bear.

Read more
SCA Exotic Plant Management Team Intern Kevin Hauser teaches youth about invasive plant, bladder campion (Silene vulgaris) at Skagway's 7th Annual Community Weed Pull.

by Kevin Hauser

Sometimes, when you least expect it, doors that you never knew existed can open right in front of you. 

Read more
SCA Intern Montana Napier overlooks Wrangell-St. Elias National Park in Alaska through the haze of a wildfire

“The preparedness level of Alaska was 5 out of 5, meaning that “resistance to control is high to extreme and resistance to extinguishment is high.” At the junction between McCarthy and Kennecott, a Smokey the Bear sign sits outside the area’s volunteer fire department headquarters, informing the public of general fire risk. I have watched the sign bounce back and forth between “High” and “Extreme” all season.”

Read more

Pages