Follow Me: SCA member blogs from the field

Follow Me is the place to read field dispatches from SCA members serving the planet all over the USA.

Andrea Willingham | February 6, 2013

Andrea’s been in Nome, Alaska since this summer, serving as the SCA Multimedia and Graphic Design Intern for Bering Land Bridge National Preserve.

Andrea Willingham | February 6, 2013

Andrea’s been in Nome, Alaska since this summer, serving as the SCA Multimedia and Graphic Design Intern for Bering Land Bridge National Preserve. We’ll be posting her accounts of her adventures in this remote, near-Arctic region over the next couple weeks.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve had my sights set on Alaska.

Okay. So. Now that I have obtained the pictures to prove it, I will tell you all about the awesome outreach project I’ve worked on for much of my internship… a project which has finally been project-ed onto some kids!
You see, the brain behind my internship was Jeff Heys, formerly a Habitat Restoration Biologist at the Anchorage Fish and Wildlife Field Office.

Jarred Shaw | December 31, 2012

Here’s Jarred’s crew mate, Leah Cantor, with her take on the SCA Sandy Relief Corps experience. PHOTO: Jennica Tamler and Leah Cantor (L-R)

Mother Nature can be a powerful and heartbreaking force. The neighborhood I was born and raised in was completely wrecked.

Jarred Shaw | December 19, 2012

My crewmates and I had good reason to look forward to our arrival in Hunterdon County.

Jarred Shaw | December 15, 2012

Our first day on post-Sandy restoration duty at Cheesequake State Park began with a foggy morning. Dave Donnelly, park superintendent, met us bright and early, outfitted for the damp weather with bright yellow rubber boots. When we told him that two of our chainsaws were on the disabled list, his gracious response was to lend us a couple spares from Cheesequake’s own gear cache.

Jarred Shaw | December 11, 2012

Hurricane Sandy rolled in on October 29th, 2012, just two days after I returned home to Matawan, New Jersey. I had been in California, serving with an SCA leader crew in Sierra National Forest. As soon as the storm subsided, I emailed my contacts at SCA, requesting assistance for the local cleanup effort. My own efforts began just five minutes from my house, at Cheesequake State Park.

Let me start off by saying that the oh so creative name of this lake and town in Alaska only makes sense for one of those things. Take a look at this picture I took of my handy map and you will see what I mean. That blue blob is the lake and that tiny place to the right of it is the town. While Big Lake has over 50 miles of shoreline and is well…

Environmental education is tricky.

I have known this fact for a while, but it’s become a constant consideration in my full time work as an environmental education intern at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During my time in Alaska working with youth in the field, youI have been a careful observer of the educators and their methods of…well, education!

As a native of Colorado, the dry, cool climate and adventurous, get-outdoors spirit of Anchorage are welcome characteristics to me as I adapt to my home (thousands of miles) away from home during my 10 month internship working for the Anchorage Fish and Wildlife Field Office.

This post was written by Lilly Stewart.

One of the great things about my internship with the SCA Hudson Valley Corps is the opportunity to work with other organizations, learn new things and take part in exciting programs like the Clearwater. For one fantastic week I got to be a sailor and teach environmental programs while sailing up and down the Hudson River.

I’m already 7 months into my fellowship and time has flown. A year ago, I never would have pictured myself living in a National Forest in Florida being a conservationist for the Student Conservation Association. I started this journey in Atlanta, Georgia after graduating with a major in recreation. I have always had a passion for recreation. I want to help everyone enjoy the great outdoors.

Above: Wolfweed Wetlands—San Bernard National Wildlife Refuge

I love the idea of working for a government environmental agency—National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Texas Parks and Wildlife, etc.—so when I got offered a position with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, I was definitely happy. When I was told I would be working in Water Resources, I was ecstatic.

As my internship at Fire Island National Seashore comes to a close, I was lucky enough to have two “employee enrichment” days - or as I like to call them, field trips!

(Photo above) Cassin takes in the aroma of flowers grown from the compost he helped create. NPS photo.

The dogs in the Denali National Park kennels produce up to 50 pounds of poo a day. That’s the same weight as some of our sled dogs! In 1980, the kennels staff decided that launching all that poo down the hill behind the kennels building probably wasn’t the greatest idea.

(Photo above) Education Department: Summer 2012

As the summer season quickly comes to a close, everybody in the park can feel the shifting of gears.

It’s been less than a week since I left Dismal, but there are a few things that I miss, and a few things that have helped me settle into the abroad program I’m participating in this semester.

This past weekend, Hudson River Park hosted an educational event dubbed “Science on the River”. On Saturday, one of our piers was transformed into an environmental education extravaganza. Several organizations converged to educate the public on core sampling, fish of the Hudson River, benthic invertebrates, sponge parks, oysters, and we had an SCA table too!

(Photo above) The students ham it up for Dan, not that they don’t act like that on a regular basis!

Week II and the epic struggle against poison oak continues. Not to beat a dead horse, but poison oak seems to be a ruling factor in our lives right now. The first victim, our very own Richard (aka Lake aka Lagos aka Fuego) was the first to fall.

Well, today was it – my summer is officially over, and it seems a little bit surreal.

For one, the weeks absolutely flew by – but as I click through my previous posts, it’s obvious why the days rolled by so quickly.

So today, I tied up a bunch of loose ends, I sent in forms, signed papers, and packed up the camera the SCA so generously lent me for the summer.

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