Follow Me: SCA member blogs from the field

Follow Me is the place to read field dispatches from SCA members serving the planet all over the USA.

There are so many random things going on right now in the world of Yosemite wildlife. Variety is the spice of life, and it is definitely keeping life exciting.

The bears are generally eating natural food sources right now, which is great. We have been watching them eat apples, blackberries, and scouring logs for insects. The apples are blooming but are not quite ripe for human consumption.

Base camp is where climbers begin their climb on Mount McKinley, the tallest mountain in North America at 20,320 ft. Base camp is at 7,200 ft on the Kahiltna Glacier. Denali National Park and Preserve Mountaineering Rangers from the Talkeetna Ranger Station are camped here during the climbing season from late April until early July.

I’m not going to lie; I wasn’t all that excited about camping on Cape Island last Wednesday night. I mean sure, I probably should have been excited about going camping for the first time in my life. But the thunderstorms that were ripping through the area for the past two nights before this “life altering” camping trip were giving me second thoughts.

Well, now that we’ve gotten the first week of craziness out of the way, it’s time to circle back around to all of those little details like who I am and why this blog even exists.

I’ve had kind of circuitous route through the old education system to end up here in the SCA. I started out my college career at Hocking College in Nelsonville, Ohio studying wildlife sciences.

When I started my SCA position in August 2010 as a Volunteer Coordinator, I had no idea how critical volunteers were to the operations of the park service. They care for trails, assist visitors, keep the park clean, and a whole host of other things.

Going from a crew member to intern to now crew leader apprentice is tough enough but trying to balance being a leader while being a “friend” is even more difficult. But like all things involving SCA it is a challenge and I accepted it with a open mind.

My crew this year was built up of 10 wonderful strong-willed teenagers and two hard working crew leaders.

Well, I have about two weeks left at my site before I head back to the Lone Star state for school. I cannot believe how fast this summer went. I know I was saying that a month ago…but sheesh!

Some projects are winding down at the refuge as well. We started dove banding early in July and we have about two weeks left.

Hi, Everyone!

My name is Steven. This summer I have been in HOT-lanta and boy is it hot. My internship has been at the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s Southeast Regional Office in Atlanta working in Visitor Services and Outreach.

During my internship, I have had the opportunity to visit field sites throughout the region.

So I went hiking through the forest the other day on Bulls Island.

Beautiful is all I can say! I’ve never experienced such a place that was so beautiful and preserved in its original state. The way the trees bristled and the way the pines stretched for what seemed like miles above my head.

The Minnesota Odonata Survey, represented by its founder and most endearing expert, visited the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center (PWLC) this past Saturday. Kurt Mead, a master naturalist and author of the most comprehensive guides to Minnesota Dragonflies and Damselflies (Order Odonata) was holding a workshop on the refuge.

This week we have been focused on capturing an untagged sow and possibly her cubs. The sow has been getting in to packs and getting near developed areas too frequently. We would like to put a radio collar on the sow and at least tag the cubs.

Hello…my name is Whitney Kempfert and I am from Minnesootah. I grew up in the twin cities, but some of the best times in my life have been spent outdoors and in National Parks.

One of the great things about working for a park in the National Capital Region is the number of park service sites in such close proximity to one another- 46 to be exact!

This week was not exactly your average week up at Schoodic, not that any week up here can be defined as average. Even though this isn’t a typical week to start out by blog, it is just too good of a story not to tell.

This week was not exactly your average week up at Schoodic, not that any week up here can be defined as average. Even though this isn’t a typical week to start out by blog, it is just too good of a story not to tell.

I noticed the first acorn hit my house this morning. By the end of August they will be falling like rain and waking me up as they pelt the house. The acorns fall from oak trees and deer love to eat them. We regularly see large bucks grazing just outside our bathroom window.

I noticed the first acorn hit my house this morning. By the end of August they will be falling like rain and waking me up as they pelt the house. The acorns fall from oak trees and deer love to eat them. We regularly see large bucks grazing just outside our bathroom window.

The weather has finally decided to cool off here and the crew absolutely loves it! Since we’ve started, the temperature has ranged from the upper ninety’s to the triple digits, with a heat index this past Saturday of 110!

The weather has finally decided to cool off here and the crew absolutely loves it! Since we’ve started, the temperature has ranged from the upper ninety’s to the triple digits, with a heat index this past Saturday of 110!

Day 8 – Day 12:

For the past few days we have been doing pretty much the same thing. We have been lopping the main trail leading from the camp ground to the parking lot for the Lighting Lake trail head. We finished chopping wood and finished refurbishing the campsites. We also did some tread work along the trail. We built a stairway through a small creek and leveled out parts as well.

Pages