Impact Stories

Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Follow Me: SCA member blogs from the field

My parents were born and raised in Laos. They were farmers, built homes from mud and plants, and did their best to live off the...

Among the waste reduction projects I worked on at Zephyr Cove, my favorite was working on food waste. I knew...
At the beginning of my internship ARAMARK brought all of the SCA Sustainability Interns to Philadelphia for an orientation to...

 

Stories from the Field--SCA's Blog

How SCA is making a difference

Google will tell you that 2,961 miles lay between Glacier Bay National Park and Seal Cove, Maine, but it will not give you...

This week, 118 high school students are headed into the field in New York City and New Jersey to help...
The Forest Service takes a special interest in salmon habitat for reasons having mostly to do with conservation. With dynamic...

Alumni Stories

Where will SCA take you?

Yellowstone National Park contains more than 1,100 miles of trail and among the most impressive is the one blazed by Dr. Mary Meagher. A first-year SCA alumna (Olympic NP, ‘57), Mary is widely credited with paving the way for women scientists in the park service. “Agencies did not hire women at that time, at least with my training and interests,” she says. “That’s just how things were.”
The diary of the first-ever SCA crew tells of “15 young woodsmen” who built a new trail along the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, “swapped yarns” and vied in “glissading marathons” in their off-time. Then 16-year old Eliot Putnam started his journal exactly 57 years ago today. Eliot would go on to travel the world with the Peace Corps, CARE, Pathfinder International and the National Council for International Health (where he served as president) promoting family and reproductive health programs in developing countries.
Great ways to celebrate Earth Day can include a walk in the park, attending a local Earth Day event, or...
“My dad is the driving force behind my desire to serve the planet. He was the one who took me to my first National Park…”

Browse our Photo Wall