Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

I’ll be a crew leader blogger for the new Hurricane Sandy recovery team at Gateway National Recreation Area! I’m really looking forward to leading and collaborating on this new, HUGE recovery we’re about to undertake with about 24 crew leaders and over 100 high school members!

by Andrea Willingham

It’s weird to think of myself as an SCA alum now, which I suppose I am, after having finished my 9-month internship with Bering Land Bridge National Preserve. I thought I would be working another SCA internship this summer, but as it turns out, last month I was offered a full time park ranger position back at Bering Land Bridge.

Yes! SCA’s very own Graphic Designer, Julia Jandrisits, responsible for our “look” as it appears from our website to our flyers to our Alternative Spring Break T-shirts, has received the G. D.

Everybody likes an “Atta Boy.” And after three years of SCA service projects in the Allegheny National Forest, District Ranger Rob Fallon gave the SCA a tremendous “Atta Boy” last week. “We signed a $1.2 million contract with the SCA (3 years ago).

VOTE HERE.SCA needs your vote. We are vying to be one of the featured presenters at South by Southwest ECO, a fairly new spin-off from the annual Austin-based entertainment and technology conference, and event organizers are relying on crowd-sourcing to help them identify the top contenders. Help us make sure that the youth voice is represented!

Conservation Caption Competition, Round 4, go!There must be a tale behind why this SCA member is running around a parking lot wrapped snugly in a mummy bag… Clue us in with your best caption (either here or on Facebook) by 5 PM EST on Monday 5/20.

Water. How you’ve been cursed when you fall from the sky, rejoiced when you flowed in river bottoms, and feared when you swell and pull in currents and waves.
For trail workers like myself, water is a dire enemy. About 90 percent of my time is spent diverting, building around, channeling, pushing, even aimlessly kicking it out of the path.

Help is on the way for park lands ravaged by Superstorm Sandy.

Help is on the way for park lands ravaged by Superstorm Sandy.The Student Conservation Association is mounting a largescale, collaborative, youth-fueled recovery program to repair storm-damaged public lands throughout the New York-New Jersey area.

One tick said to another tick…It’s time for round 3 of the Conservation Caption Competition, Spring 2013 Edition!If you can stand to look at this photo long enough to think up a caption, post it to the comments, either here or on Facebook, by Monday at 5 PM EST. We’ll use arbitrarily determined standards to choose our favorite and repost it to good ol’ FB.

More than 1,500 volunteers joined in SCA Earth Day projects nationwide over the last two weekends. Earthsavers of all stripes planted trees in Kansas City, prairie grasses in Houston, and shrubs in Seattle.

Is time, once more, for another round of the Conservation Caption Competition! For round two, we have a photo that you may recognize from SCA’s follow me blog, but only if your memory extends all the way back to 2011.

Comment, either here or on Facebook, with something cleverly resembling a caption by 5 PM EST Monday, 4/22.

It’s time! Time to revive the Conservation Caption Competition! Spring is, after all, a season of renewal. To start things off, we have a pic from last month’s NPS Academy session in Grand Teton National Park. Quite an outfit, amiright?Comment with your cleverest caption by 5 PM EST Friday 4/5 either here or on Facebook.

Norming to Performing

Photo: Hiking Big Sycamore Canyon Falls

A week can seem like forever yet go by in a flash. We spent our last day(Friday, March 29th) as a group working with native plants, for a change of pace, in the Rancho Sierra Vista, not too far from the Wendy Trail trailhead. To prevent over watering natives planted earlier in March by the first California ASB, we established a simple system.

For a small change of pace, the National Park Service led us to Upper Zuma Canyon. Despite a new location with greenery that was vaguely reminiscent of the forests of Washington, our task for the day was a classic conservation work: removing invasives This time we took on the poison hemlock and Italian thistle.

The second day at Malibu Lagoon State Beach we continued our invasives battle. A small group kayaked out to one of the further islands to do work. One problem. There were only two kayaks available so ASB members had to be ferried out two at a time - a hilarious scene to behold.

The majority of ASB participants spent most of yesterday flying into either Burbank, CA or LAX. After waking up early for morning flights, I was glad that we were saving group introductions for Monday. Instead we met each other at our own pace as people arrived to Malibu Creek State Park. Students who arrived first, like myself, set up tents for ourselves and for those getting in later.

It begins, but who’s to say when it begins. The drive and desire to protect natural spaces, to ensure adequate resources for future generations, to promote the recovery of endangered species while preventing others from becoming threatened, and to simply enjoy something so majestic that man can never hope to recreate it. It’s conservation.

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. (March 22, 2013) – How can one sum up the past week here with SCA alternative spring break? Gathered around a campfire, under a big clear sky, with Orion overhead, a mandolin strums. Bluegrass fills our ears. Songs of the mountains and the stars. Marshmallows are passed around.

Exploring a gator pond in a swampy cypress mound. Knee deep in water.

Photos by David Krantz

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla.

Photo via Giovanni Paccaloni, Flickr

BIG CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. (March 19, 2013) — Nearly everybody here has a story of someone who has driven into a canal. That’s just life in the ‘Glades.

Canals cut along all the roads here; they always have. The roads were made by digging the canals and dumping the dirt to form the roadways.

Pages

SCA Themes

Our 2015 Summer Roadtrip takes you to amazing places and member stories around the country.

75000 Members have served with SCA

Over 75,000 women and men have served with SCA - read some of their stories here.

Read about the women and men who helped build America’s oldest and largest youth conservation service organization here

Meet some of the amazing women who blazed a trail with SCA

Member Bloggers

Rachelle Hedges
San Mateo County Parks
See Posts by Rachelle Hedges
Sarika Khanwilkar
Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge
See Posts by Sarika Khanwilkar
Elizabeth Braatz
St. Croix Wetland Management District
See Posts by Elizabeth Braatz
Noah M. Schlager
National Trails Intermountain Region
See Posts by Noah M. Schlager
Dakota McCoy
Yosemite National Park
See Posts by Dakota McCoy

Staff Bloggers

Ann Pedtke
New York City
See posts by Ann Pedtke
Joseph Thurston
Washington, DC
See posts by Joseph Thurston

Alumni Stories

Where will SCA take you?

“Something different” is what Jessica Aronson Cook was looking for when she first joined the Student Conservation Association (SCA) as...
Mary Nghe and Stacey Kinney -- two CDIP Interns with the Student Conservation Association
Growing up in Houston, Stacey Kinney says she only saw ducks on office park ponds. Now, here she was at...

New findings on SCA's youth impact - read about the Search Institute's study

A new multi-year study on SCA’s youth impact shows significant gains across a wide range of indicators.
Read about the Study here »

Michelle Bobowick, Interning with SCA in Yellowstone National Park, 1985
It was 1958, when our family affair with the Student Conservation Association began. Since, then our family has continued its commitment to improving the world around us through SCA.
During the summer of ’69, twenty students arrived at Great Smokey Mountains National Park ready to clear windfall damage in...
When Student Conservation Association (SCA) supporter and 1983 alumnus, Bob Kachinski, was fresh out of college, he went on what...

Browse our Photo Wall

Recent Video

Donate today to the Student Conservation Association and help build the next generation of conservation leaders.